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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/20/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Mo-

    MM Awards 2024

    I nominate Breeze for the following categories: Best Cryptographer Most Likely to Marry a FOB
  2. 4 points
    Happened last December. It's taken me almost four years but I was able to qualify for a motorcycle racing license. Like with track days, I'm going to start off one step at a time and try to get a few races in this summer. Here goes! A few photos from the day I got the license: Below is a picture of me trying to follow Toni Elias (Elias in the golden helmet). Elias is the current MotoAmerica champion and he was at the track that same day. He's incredibly fast and so smooth. I tried to follow him and almost crashed going wide on the track lol hence why I missed the apex by a mile! All of this is about moving forward!:
  3. 4 points
    Just stopping by to say hi and see who is around. So, crazy to think of the time I spent on here and now I only keep in touch with very few.
  4. 4 points
    just ran for 25 minutes, 1st time ever in my life, cudnt even run 60 secs in September lmao
  5. 3 points
    Breeze

    What are you reading?

    I couldn't find any book threads and I don't want to lose any recommendations Next, I would love to read "The Clear Quran: A thematic translation."
  6. 3 points
    List of food I can now make: chicken korma, muttar keema, aloo subzi, shrimp thai curry, pizza...and rice of course...and eggs. #YESSSS
  7. 3 points
    'Tis the season to hear back from PhD admission committees. Please deploy a du'a or two in this direction!
  8. 3 points
    Haku

    Random Islamic Questions

    there are valid arguments for female imams, although in very minority. Did you read that book (misquoting Muhammed (SAW)), it's in there. But in the end of the day, the issue is that of a jurisprudence. These rules are derived methodically in a scholarly manner. Unfortunately, layman inject their own one liners. What makes sense for a morroccan man may seem silly to you. that's not heresy. Heresy would be to deny some well known thing in Islam. So it would be always prudent to hold your personal judgement before learning more about the subject.
  9. 2 points
    After the mishap at the half Ironman, I was able to complete two sprint triathlons and have been improving in all three events. This fall I’m running a half marathon in preparation for next year!
  10. 2 points
    Mufasa

    MM Awards 2024

    I'm still waiting for the results from 2013
  11. 2 points
    Mufasa

    Cryptocurrencies: THE FUTURE IS HERE

    I've been doing a lot of research on cryptocurrencies over the last few days. The most popular of these currencies is obviously Bitcoin, which has been in the news much. Many feel that they are too late to the game- but there are a ton of currencies out there that are just beginning to surge, and actually provide much more promising models than Bitcoin (which happens simply to be the first and therefore has name-recognition, but is not necessarily the best). Now, I don't have much money to actually invest, but I also don't have many expenses, so I am thinking to invest a very [very] modest amount. Anyone investing in cryptocurrencies should tread carefully and acknowledge that we do not know the futures of these currencies. They could all crash. Or, we could have a situation as with Bitcoin, where people who invested hundreds could today be millionaires. Of course, it will probably be something more modest and nuanced. I would be happy to share insightful articles/forecasts if others are interested. My major hold-back at this point, however, is the Islamic issue -- whether they are halal, haram, or something in between. I have seen mixed [though vague and maybe unqualified] opinions from scholars, none of which have really made me feel convinced either way. I just came across this article, which I have not yet read, but which I think Okays Bitcoins at least for certain usages. This thread is just to open a general discussion about cryptocurrencies. My first question for Mo- or others who know about cryptocurrencies: What would be your major arguments for it being haram? Let's start there, and then I'll have some more pointed questions depending on your responses.
  12. 2 points
    Mo-

    Cryptocurrencies: THE FUTURE IS HERE

    Ok so I asked Sh. al Judai about a wide range of topics and their Islamic perspective. He told me some things to hold into generality: The four major madhabs do not have significant differences on what they consider halal and haram when it comes to modern financial transactions, as they did not deal with the same things we dealt with today. There are however minor differences on some points Modern scholars, irrespective of madhab, take from a variety of sources (i.e., other madhabs and opinions, including those of non-traditional sources such as some trustworthy Shia sources (e.g. Sh. Muhammad Baqir al Sadr's book on banking has been cited by many) when it comes to Islamic finance. There is a lot of Ikhtilaf between scholars on numerous points, coming from both a lack of specialization and a large requirement for Ijtihad. These things are important because, people often ask what a specific madhab says about a certain transaction, but due to the nuances of Islamic jurisprudence today and the rapid rate of innovation in fian Firstly, some definitions I learned (or improved upon): Qimar (gambling): Gambling occurs when two parties enter into an agreement that based on an outcome related to probability or chance, one party will win and the other will lose (e.g. a coin toss with a winner and a loser). Gharar (risk, in finance, risk arising from speculation, synonymous with uncertainty): Is in Islamic business terms, when the outcome of a transaction bears some level of uncertainty. Investments with extreme Gharar are generally considered haram, for example, investing in something that is priced irrationally like a bubble with abnormal returns. Mudaraba (speculation): When an investor/market participant holds a certain view of the future and enacts a transaction based on this view (e.g. buying stock in a company deemed profitable). [Note: the common definition people use for this is the idea of the Mudaraba contract, which is a very narrow element of the actual theory]. Mudaraba al Sila' (speculation on a good/service/commodity): When a market participant purchases something for a holding period in the hope its price will change in the direction they favor by the end of this holding period (e.g. buying a barrel of oil and keeping it for sale at a later date for a higher price). Mudaraba al Si'ir (speculation on price): Where a market participant invests purely speculating on the price of something, and not on the thing itself (e.g., a contract for difference). This is haram as it is a form of gambling. Bay' (sale): the exchange of goods or services. Bay' al Salam (deferred sale): when a sale takes place, with the payment upfront and the good/service delivered at a later date. In this sense, this type of sale can take place in two manners in modern terms: Cash paid today for the provision of a good or service later; A good or service is provided today for the provision of cash later. Bay' al Inah (cash buyback): when a deferred sale takes place, but the good is sold back immediately at a lower price. This has major ikhtilaf, the Shafi'i's say it is permissible, but the other madhabs say it is generally not. All madhabs however agree that if the intention of the person is to essentially create an interest bearing loan in all but name (i.e. a heela [a work around]), it is haram. Cryptocurrencies: On Bitcoin, he informed me that the UK Fatwa Committee (which consists of himself, Sh. Suhaib Hasan and several other prominent UK based scholars) had decided putting money into Bitcoin (and cryptocurrencies in general) were not halal at the current time for multiple reasons: It is not currently recognized as legal tender in its current form, and several governments have instituted bans on it. This is contrary to the idea that Muslims should obey the laws of the countries they live in. It acts as a source of extreme Gharar. Whilst the idea itself does not go against Islamic principles (i.e., crypto in of itself isn't haram), the fact that it is primarily used for money laundering (whether by Chinese people going against capital controls or people who have illicit income through black market places), means it is currently unsuitable for use. Online trading: The Sh. corrected me on the point that speculation is not gambling Islamically, unless two parties are involved. I explained to him that, other than traditional retail brokerages which only generally sell vanilla stocks and bonds, most retail investors only have access to websites that provide CFD's (contract's for difference). He informed that this is equivalent to gambling if the speculation is being made in this case purely for the hope of an increase in price and contains two contracted parties. However in the case of actually owning the commodity/bond/stock, without a contract for difference, there is no problem with speculation as long as it does not carry extremely high risk. Insurance: Most scholars today say insurance is haram, but Sh. al Judai said it is halal generally speaking and there have been modern scholars from all backgrounds who hold the same view. He says this because, Bay' al Salam can be considered a primitive form of insurance and has generally been allowed. The issue with insurance comes down to contract specifics and the type of insurance (naturally for example, life insurance would be particularly troublesome Islamically). Insurance in itself can be sold in the form of an investment (e.g. an insurance company invests the money you give them for a particular policy in liquid assets, and grows a large enough balance sheet to pay off any claims) or it could be in the form of relying on the collective yearly payments from clients outweighing the collective yearly claims. The contracts themselves ultimately vary too and it really depends on a case by case basis. I asked him a bunch of other things in my time and went of plenty of examples for my own project. I can share those too but I felt what I included here were things related to the questions in this thread in particular.
  13. 2 points
    Mo-

    Cryptocurrencies: THE FUTURE IS HERE

    I would like to add, blockchain itself and the concepts around it are generally very innovative and could lead to some major changes in the way we handle transactions by enhancing speed, security and allowing for a return to decentralization (similar to the free banking era of the past). The main issue with this of course is how it will affect government finances who are dependent on measures like quantitative easing/tightening where they can effectively print money or burn money. We've had central banks for the good part of the past century and they are essential for the existence of big governments.
  14. 2 points
    Mo-

    Cryptocurrencies: THE FUTURE IS HERE

    We have to define the differences between the two primary sorts of speculation: 1. Speculative investing (halal), 2. Gambling (haram). An example of speculative investment, for example, would be purchasing Exxon Mobil stock because you believe that they will outperform their peers and the market. This means that you inherently believe that the company is going to generate value for you over time and that is why you want to own its stock. An example of gambling, would be purchasing Exxon Mobil stock because you think the price will go up. Not because you inherently believe the company will generate value in the future, but simply because you are of the belief that the price of the stock itself will go up as a result of market momentum or another market force unrelated to underlying value. Now you're probably asking "didn't both examples contain the same action?". Of course, but the intentions were different. How do you then apply this rule to Bitcoin? In the case of Bitcoin, or cryptocurrency in general, it isn't generating any value. Any movements it makes are driven by market momentum in one direction or another and are unrelated to any sort of underlying value. Why? Because Bitcoin isn't a value generating asset (like a house that can be rented, a company that produces goods or services, a cow that produces milk, etc.) in the traditional sense, in that you as an owner can't do anything with it that would generate value. The only way to generate value with cryptocurrencies is through the ones that operate a proof-of-stake model, but very few people would be able to acquire the amount of necessary cryptocurrency in a reputable PoS network. tl;dr unless you have enough for PoS on a reputable network, crypto is effectively gambling.
  15. 2 points
    M-C

    Last film you watched?

    Jumanji WAY BETTER THAN I THOUGHT ITD BE. I had fun watching this movie.
  16. 2 points
    Haku

    What are you reading?

  17. 2 points
    Mufasa

    Listening to...

    got a ticket to see Matisyahu
  18. 2 points
    Mo-

    What are you reading?

    I'm still reading Leviathan by Hobbes. Haven't had much time for leisure reading if I am being honest.
  19. 2 points
    Mufasa

    Thread Al-3rabi

    I'll send you some material in a few days if that's cool. I'll include my favorite stories we read and her vocab lists.
  20. 2 points
    Spider

    Random Islamic Questions

    In short, it's because Prophethood is an extremely heavy task, and by nature, men compared to women are better able to handle it. But Allah knows best. Here's a fatwa on that, if you want a little more elaboration: https://islamqa.info/en/158044
  21. 2 points
    superman

    Thread Al-3rabi

    In this post I hope to clearly explain the idaafa. I feel the idaafa is the first interesting thing I came across which slightly elevated me above a very basic understanding of Arabic grammer 6 months ago. Idaafa An idaafa is used when you want to refer to a noun that is possessed by another noun (that may also be possessed by another noun etc..). I know I made that sound complicated so I'll give some examples of what I am talking about in English. For instance we can say "the Queen of England". This is an idaafa with two nouns where we refer to the Queen that is "possessed" by England. Or what about "John's mum" or "the mother of John" which is also an idaafa with 2 nouns where "the mother" is possessed by "John". Finally - an idaafa isn't just restricted to 2 nouns, it can go on for ever. So we can also say: "John's mum's car" or "The car of the mother of John" This is an idaafa with 3 nouns (car, mum and John) where "the car" is possessed by "the mother" who is possessed by "John". In order to construct an idaafa in Arabic we just stick our nouns together in a line so that: The car of John is literally "siyaaratu John". A university professor is "ustaadhu jaami3atin" A book of knowledge is "kitaabu 3lmin" John's mum's office is "maktabu ummi John" You should see that the noun we want to refer to is the first term in the idaafa. Nouns in the middle of an idaafa directly possess the noun that precedes it. Finally, you may have noticed some funny case endings/lack of tanwin or definite article in some of the terms. Unfortunately idaafa's in Arabic follow a strict set of rules. Rules 1) The first term in an idaafa is in the case that any normal noun would be if it were placed in that point of a sentence. Ie if an idaafa is an object of a verb then the first term is in the accusative, if the idaafa is followed by a preposition then it is in the genitive, if the idaafa is the subject of an equational it is in the nominative etc etc... 2) All other nouns in the idaaf (ie not the first) must be in the genitive case 3) Only the last noun in an idaafa can have tanwin (to signify it's indefinite) or an added alif at the start to show that it is definite. If the last noun in an idaafa has tanwin then the entire idaafa is indefinite and if the last noun has an added alif then the entire idaafa is definite. Ie A university professor's book is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin" -- also (a book of a professor of a university) The university professor's book "kitaabu ustaadhi al-jaami3ati" -- also (the book of the professor of the university) 4) Adjectives describing terms in the idaafa cannot be wedged in between nouns of an idaafa. These must come at the end and must agree with the noun it describes in case, gender, pluarity, definiteness etc. Ie A big book of a small professor of a university is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin sagheerin kabirun" You can also see that nouns which are written later on are described before those written earlier. If I made an mistakes please let me know. Next post should be about: Rules of verb-subject agreement (jumlat fi3liya/ismiya)
  22. 2 points
    Happy birthday Spider! *grabs her partyhat*
  23. 2 points
    AROwnen

    Random Islamic Questions

    No worries Haku, my prime survival strategy for masjid is bumbling white guy who doesn't interrupt. Whenever I say anything I plant a quizzical look on my face and say it in the form of a question. The masjid is full of frustrated lecturers who stand way too close for my comfort. The Moroccan man is actually a friend who got me a thobe and wool hat so we can go around like twins. No lie. Breeze- I don't know what to say. The imagining of a woman trying to bow and plant her backside seems awkward and painful? If it makes you feel better I creak like a wooden gate in the wind when I pray. Loud enough to get quick glances. Forget about sitting my haunches on my heels with my toes pointing front. Easier to bend a rail spike. Lol
  24. 2 points
    Mufasa

    What's new

    flowers are the symbols of heaven so I interpreted it that way...right??
  25. 2 points
    Zimbabwe

    Bulimia

    I think I have inverse bulimia. I eat and eat and eat, but just don't do the whole throwing up bit afterwards. Almost everything makes me hungry and the last/next meal is never far off my mind. Imam Ghazali's work on 'Breaking the Two Desires' is about our sexual/'food' desires and I really think the latter is not given as much attention as it should. I heart food way too much.
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