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PlainCrazy

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  1. Oats is a grain which in England sustains the horses and in Scotland sustains the people Entry for oats in Samuel Johnsons dictionary
  2. I did this ages back but the original links are all changed boohoo - I remember a website that had kia in the title but I can't remember what it was cos now that just redirects me to cars and stuff. The original had the test and an interesting in-depth way of looking at personality (employer at work is doing this test and I totally disagree cos as zimmi put it, there's way more to personality then a bunch of letters. Anyhoo, what I did on here gave me a totally different result to the kiersey test, and I just wanted to find it again to sort of prove my point that it wasnt as innate as ... What's the wors the boss used? Predisposition. The predisposition of foxes born to steal out of henhouses etc - how can i be predisposed to anything if my personality type has actually changed over tge years?
  3. Ohh.... Coool! That makes loads more sense! So what does it actually mean? The actual poem? If you could be so kind as to oblige me dear simmi!
  4. K... I think this thread is destined to die before its even begun but oh well, I'll take a chance! Recently someone got me into this Arabic poem by a poet called asmaee, its called Sawt Safeer Bulbuli - and I would like to know more about it really, if anyone is interested at all (I know this is completely obscure and random but theres a glut of videos on YouTube about this poem and I can't find a single translation! Now I'm not proficient in Arabic at all but I really got into the story: Once upon a time (this is the gist of what I sort of understood from an Arabic story told on YouTube) the Caliph Abu Jafar al Mansur put some kind of restriction on the poets - and said they would only get paid if they came up with something majorly original. If a poet told him a poem he already knew then he would be stripped of his title... Anyway, the crafty caliph could memorize everything he heard (and this is what really confused me) apparently he had a memory like a computer and also owned a slave n slave girl who were the same If you haven't already switched off by now, he issued a challenge to the poets that if he was given a poem he could not learn immediately then he would pay the poet the weight in gold what he wrote the poem on (excuse the terrible grammar) So I'm really missing something here but anyway no poet manages to rise to the challenge except Asmaee, who disguises himself and sings the Sawt Safeer Bulbuli to him - which he fails to memorise... And then Asmaee ends up emptying the baytul maal because he gives him the poem carved on huge marble slabs carried by camels. Apparently he gave it back once he took the unfair challenge off the poets .... Anyway, the poem itself is kinda catchy and I really want to know everything anyone might know about it! It seems to be a big story in the Arab world - any clues? Rambling completely permitted. K I think this might be the link... http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?feature=youtube_gdata_player&v=LCkK2Uc5y2Q&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DLCkK2Uc5y2Q%26feature%3Dyoutube_gdata_player&gl=GB
  5. The title is from a Sherlock Holmes story! Sherlock is quite Aspergerish
  6. I have a book hoard. I should probably give them away to charity, but then I'm waiting for the day I have a beautiful personal library to read in - and then I'll need all the stacks. I don't read much anymore - I can't afford to. Sometimes I just sit in the corner of the library (on the very infrequent rare occasions i get there) and exult in that booksmell ... Oh I'm going to get upset if I carry on in this vein. I just ended up revisiting this forum after ages and small wonder I've spent all my time in the book section!
  7. It didn't go on for that long - the title is an exaggeration - the stories are definitely a collaborated work and they ran out of stories way before they got to 1000 - but the time scale is about 4 years for the original story SPOILER ALERT - cos shahrezad manages to have a few kids in that time. white rose, you are reading a highly sanitised version of the nights if you've gotten to sinbad the sailor without a mention of zina - its full of that - and magic. In fact translations edited out all the racy parts. Still a great read especially the battle between a witch and a djinn where the djinn turns himself into pomegranate seeds and the witch-princess turns herself into a rooster to peck them all up but she misses the seed with the djinns life in it... That was an epic battle and it even seemed, to me, to have shades of dumbledore vs voldemort in it. The whole serpent/water shield sequence just before that... Ah, I better stop rambling!
  8. Problem with the book - all the negative press it gets makes people want to read it. Stopping people from reading it will never work, and the more we say how bad it is the more curious kiddies will be who will then read it and defend it- it wasn't all thaaaat bad I can hear voiced in the future. It's a bit like ... Making harry pothead out to be the best book ever ever ever and then it becomes a disappointing read for people who were expecting more (although, no, that's not likely) I wouldn't recommend the book to anyone but vehement opposition will garner the underdog many supporters. What really irritated me about it though, is that Bella is so passive and does absolutely nothing, while eddy (crullegern) objectifies and controls her. Will little kiddies expect to sit about doing absolutely nothing, being passive little drips all their lives and expect wonderful people to somehow read their minds and be thrilled with their non personality? K, fair enough we all wish we could be understood a little more now and again but to be made to sit on a pedestal only to reveal our clay feet is inhumane.
  9. Oh when jem gets caught without his pants on!! Oh that whole scene was so funny I nearly died laughing (I was reading it in IT class... Nearly got thrown out!)
  10. Haha, those crummy point horrors and sweet valley high bunch... Point horror in particular is quaintly dated: there was a book called call waiting - all about a girl who lies to a boy she likes when he calls her by pretending a stalker is calling her half way through the call... No point me going on about it - probably no one has a clue about what I'm saying but oh well... Great thread for talking to oneself!
  11. It's Eva ibbotson - the platform one... Ramona quimby Edward - a really Victorian kinda book Enid blyton: various REDWALL! E nesbit Victoria forrest The windsinger series by William nicholson Ian whybrow: the little wolf series. And stuff people are posting - ohh soo much nostalgiaaaa! OMG I can remember so many snatches of stories - really really evocative ones - I can remember the curved brown pages and the smell and taste of the books and the pictures on them but not the titles!
  12. I get where pistache is coming from actually - it seems tons worse as a girl, to have to get married and give up everything. Most of the negative feelings spring from ego - why should I do anything to save him? He should be doing this stuff automatically. While we hardly have everything our way in our single lives, we labour under the delusion that we do. So its easy to resent anything he does as an intrusion or failure because he doesn't match up to the exacting standards we were expecting in our heads. The best bit of advice though, is from erma bombeck: marriage has no guarantees. If that's what you're looking for, go live with a car battery
  13. Erm... Maybe thus shiuld be another thread but: can anyone recommend Muslim fiction writers and their books to me that are good? The only one I've heard of is randa abdul fatteh. Also... Aren't there any books published on djinn stories, as alternative ghost stories? I bet they would sell ridiculously well - (I mean, if the world can accept twilight then why not offer it some real horror?) Any budding Muslim writers out there to take up this challenge?
  14. Sharon penman does historical fiction which is pretty fun to read - and she's done a lionheart one. I've not read it yet.
  15. Faranheit 451... Ray bradbury The temp books burn at apparently... And firefighters make book bonfires instead of fighting fires
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