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superman

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  1. Like
    superman reacted to Mo- in Cryptocurrencies: THE FUTURE IS HERE   
     
    1) but the loss is not proportional and is deemed an externality. In a bet, the loss is explicit and contracted between two parties, therefore it is gambling Islamically. When Walmart decides to open a new store, it isn't betting against the local stores, in fact due to agglomeration it is expected some local stores could even see an increase in customers. 
     
    2) speculation in Islam is halal. 
  2. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in An awesome shirt i found, Proud to be Muslim.   
    you can design the shirt and teesprings have a factory that produces the shirts on demand. You get like a 50/50 split of any revenue made. This dude just decided to make a design and advertise it to a niche audience lol
  3. Like
    superman got a reaction from Mo- in A Nightly Exhilaration   
    Lol I misread slow for sleep. My point is that I don't think you understand your sources and sometimes it seems you stretch at straws to link religion to science. Ok ok it's one thing to say I read this cool paper that might suggest x, but why quote papers with terms you don't understand. And if you do know these terms then you should explain them, as the audience on mm aren't neuroscientists.

    Finally googling something doesn't mean you can understand it. True scientific comprehension starts with months of study through a text book and then solving problems.I only bring this up because you always post something here about Quran and science and quote one article that seems like it agrees, but that you may not understand.
  4. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Favourite Pieces of Poetry   
    can i see ur website 
  5. Haha
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in salam   
    lol not really
  6. Like
    superman got a reaction from Mo- in Magical Dreams   
     
    so it was basically door to door sales? 
    Regardless - they weren't offering you a stake in the company so it's not a venture as far as you're concerned (which is also what your definition states)
  7. Like
    superman reacted to Mufasa in Listening to...   
    got a ticket to see Matisyahu
  8. Like
    superman got a reaction from Spider in What are you reading?   
     
    That's fair enough - but don't you feel like you get a worse experience as the book is designed to be read in order?
  9. Haha
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in What are you reading?   
    To write a poem you first must rhyme,
    But I can see you pouting,
    I realise you don't know that much,
    As you studied writing
     
     
     
  10. Haha
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in What are you reading?   
    You may write me down in history
    With your bitter, twisted lies,
    You may tread me in the very dirt
    But still, like dust, I'll rise.
  11. Confused
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in What are you reading?   
    wow wat r u on about 
  12. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Economics as Religion   
    i think you have to create your own opportunities in the market if you do a degree like creative writing 
  13. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Random Islamic Questions   
    I do believe that women are able to command teams, classrooms etc however it largely depends on the culture. In a lot of cultures women aren't respected enough to be taken seriously as leaders, but I felt this should have been a non issue since God has always proved his messengers with showing their followers miracles. I would think it's a bit irrelevant weather or not you witness a miracle at the hands of a man or a woman. Like if a woman had split the sea would it make it any less amazing?
  14. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Random Islamic Questions   
    Women have been able to prove themselves on the world stage throughout history, ie Elizabeth I, Maggie Thatcher, Angela Merkel etc etc.
    But you never see any female managers in mens football - and honestly I think there's a good reason for that. It would never work imo as there's too many egos flying around. But idk.
     
  15. Thanks
    superman reacted to Mufasa in Thread Al-3rabi   
     
    I'll send you some material in a few days if that's cool.
    I'll include my favorite stories we read and her vocab lists. 
  16. Like
    superman got a reaction from Mufasa in Thread Al-3rabi   
    I also decided to explain how you can use the grammar rules outlined above to deconstruct meaning in Arabic. A lot of the time when I come across in Arabic I have trouble seeing if something is an Idaafa or noun adjective phrase. Let's take the sentence:
     
    إيران: السعودية هي السبب الرئيسي لمشكلات المنطقة
    Right off the bat I can recognise two words that are common in English - Iran and Saudi which are outlined in black. In red I marked out hiya - which I think is probably a pronoun of separation.
    Ok after this we only have 4 words left to decode. If we look at the phrase in green we can see that the definite article is attached before each word.
     
    Therefore this can not be an Idaafa. This is a big step (for me anyway) as I wouldn't have been able to recognise this a few months ago. One thing we can infer is that since this isn't an idaafa then both sabab and ra'eesi probably form an equational sentence (Infact ra'eesi looks suspiciously like a nisbaa adjective - more on that later). I  know for a fact that sabab means reason and that in a noun adjective phrase, the noun comes first. So al-sabab must mean "the reason".
    The 2nd word ra'eesi looks a lot like ra'ees - ie president, head, leader etc. Since a noun wouldn't make sense in this situation, ra'eesi must be an adjective related to the noun ra'ees. Infact we can see that is a nisbaa adjective from the suffix. 
    You can go through a few meanings for the green phrase, until you find something that makes sense - ie we have the presidential reason or the head reason. Of course the head reason, or leading reason makes more sense.
     
    Finally looking at the blue phrase we have prefix li which means "for". You can only have something "for" a noun so mushkilaat (problems) must a the noun. We know the last term (region) can't be an adjective as it has the definite article. We can't have an indefinite subject with a definite predicate in an equational sentence. However, since the first term doesn't have a definite article and the last term does we can assume this construct is infact an idaafa so that our blue phrase is (the problems of the reigon). Now this phrase would have killed a couple of months ago because I wouldn't be able to discern any meaning from two nouns plopped side by side like this, especially with one of them being indefinite.
     
    Anyway putting everything together we have:
     
    Iran: Saudi is the leading cause of the reigon's problems
  17. Thanks
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Thread Al-3rabi   
    In this post I hope to clearly explain the idaafa. I feel the idaafa is the first interesting thing I came across which slightly elevated me above a very basic understanding of Arabic grammer 6 months ago.
     
    Idaafa
    An idaafa is used when you want to refer to a noun that is possessed by another noun (that may also be possessed by another noun etc..).  I know I made that sound complicated so I'll give some examples of what I am talking about in English.
     
    For instance we can say "the Queen of England". This is an idaafa with two nouns where we refer to the Queen that is "possessed" by England.
    Or what about "John's mum" or "the mother of John" which is also an idaafa with 2 nouns where "the mother" is possessed by "John". Finally - an idaafa isn't just restricted to 2 nouns, it can go on for ever. So we can also say:
    "John's mum's car" or "The car of the mother of John"
    This is an idaafa with 3 nouns (car, mum and John) where "the car" is possessed by "the mother" who is possessed by "John". 
     
     
    In order to construct an idaafa in Arabic we just stick our nouns together in a line so that:
     
    The car of John is literally "siyaaratu John". 
    A university professor is "ustaadhu jaami3atin"
    A book of knowledge is "kitaabu 3lmin"
    John's mum's office is "maktabu ummi John"
     
    You should see that the noun we want to refer to is the first term in the idaafa. Nouns in the middle of an idaafa directly possess the noun that precedes it. Finally, you may have noticed some funny case endings/lack of tanwin or definite article in some of the terms. Unfortunately idaafa's in Arabic follow a strict set of rules.
     
    Rules
    1) The first term in an idaafa is in the case that any normal noun would be if it were placed in that point of a sentence. Ie if an idaafa is an object of a verb then the first term is in the accusative, if the idaafa is followed by a preposition then it is in the genitive, if the idaafa is the subject of an equational it is in the nominative etc etc...
     
    2) All other nouns in the idaaf (ie not the first) must be in the genitive case
     
    3) Only the last noun in an idaafa can have tanwin (to signify it's indefinite) or an added alif at the start to show that it is definite. If the last noun in an idaafa has tanwin then the entire idaafa is indefinite and if the last noun has an added alif then the entire idaafa is definite. Ie
     
    A university professor's book is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin" -- also (a book of a professor of a university)
    The university professor's book "kitaabu ustaadhi al-jaami3ati" -- also (the book of the professor of the university)
     
    4) Adjectives describing terms in the idaafa cannot be wedged in between nouns of an idaafa. These must come at the end and must agree with the noun it describes in case, gender, pluarity, definiteness etc. Ie
    A big book of a small professor of a university is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin sagheerin kabirun"  
    You can also see that nouns which are written later on are described before those written earlier.
     
    If I made an mistakes please let me know. 
    Next post should be about: Rules of verb-subject agreement (jumlat fi3liya/ismiya)
  18. Thanks
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Thread Al-3rabi   
    In a few posts I will outline basic grammar rules and constructs as I come across them. I feel that by explaining and reiterating these things they will stick in my head longer. There is no particular order here and my source is "All the Arabic you never learned the 1st time around".
     
    **This is intended to be a quick reference to basic grammar rules. Please google these things to learn more**
     
    This post will get some boring stuff out the way
     
    Types of sentences
    Sentences in Arabic either have verbs or they don't. Those without verbs are called equational sentences (ie  al siyaaratu kabirun). The basic equational sentence has a subject + predicate. The subject is what the sentence is about and the predicate gives you extra information about the subject. So the car (al siyaarat) is the subject and big (kabir) is the predicate. I won't go over the basic tanwin rules or even how to say "the car is big" or "the big car" or "a big car" etc, however I will emphasise that the predicate must agree with the subject in number, gender and case - This is crucial when trying to understand sentences. 
     
    Those with verbs have 3 main components: subject, verb and object. The subject does the verb on the object and these sentences can have different syntaxes, ie subject + verb + object OR verb + subject + object. 
     
    Nominative Case
    This is the "default" case for the subject of a sentence - ie unless stated otherwise the subject will be nominative. It is also used for the predicate of an equational sentence. The nominative case is characterised by adding dhamma onto the end of a noun or adjective
     
    Genitive Case
    Nouns are in the genitive case if they directly follow prepositions (words such as min, fi, ila) etc and are characterised by adding a kasara on the end. For example siyaarat is the genitive case: fi siyaaratin kabirin. Notice how the adjective kabir is also in the genitive case - this follows the agreement rules of case we discussed earlier. 
    Words can also be in the genitive case as part of an idaafa - which will be discussed later.
     
    Accusative Case 
    Nouns which are the object of a verb are said to be in the accusative case and they are marked by adding a fatha on the end of the word. For instance - ana ra'aytu kitaaban sagheeran (I saw a small book). Here kitaab is in the accusative as I "saw" the book. Notice how the word sagheer is also in the accusative (following from case agreement). You should notice that case agreement is important for adjectives - as it specifically tells us which noun is being described. This will become more apparent when we discuss the idaafa. 
     
    Finally - indefinite accusative words are written with an extra alif on the end
     
    Pronoun of Separation
    To say this book you write "hadha al kitaabu"
    To say this is a book you write "hadha kitaabun"
    But how do you say "this is the book?" - You add a pronoun to break up the sentence, ie we write "hadha hua al kitaab"
    The pronoun of separation must follow the gender of the noun we want to describe so that to say: This is the female director we write "hadhahi hiya mudeeratun"
    Finally - the pronoun of separation isn't necessary when being used with an idaafa - but it can still be used for emphasis. 
     
  19. Thanks
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Thread Al-3rabi   
    In this post I hope to clearly explain the idaafa. I feel the idaafa is the first interesting thing I came across which slightly elevated me above a very basic understanding of Arabic grammer 6 months ago.
     
    Idaafa
    An idaafa is used when you want to refer to a noun that is possessed by another noun (that may also be possessed by another noun etc..).  I know I made that sound complicated so I'll give some examples of what I am talking about in English.
     
    For instance we can say "the Queen of England". This is an idaafa with two nouns where we refer to the Queen that is "possessed" by England.
    Or what about "John's mum" or "the mother of John" which is also an idaafa with 2 nouns where "the mother" is possessed by "John". Finally - an idaafa isn't just restricted to 2 nouns, it can go on for ever. So we can also say:
    "John's mum's car" or "The car of the mother of John"
    This is an idaafa with 3 nouns (car, mum and John) where "the car" is possessed by "the mother" who is possessed by "John". 
     
     
    In order to construct an idaafa in Arabic we just stick our nouns together in a line so that:
     
    The car of John is literally "siyaaratu John". 
    A university professor is "ustaadhu jaami3atin"
    A book of knowledge is "kitaabu 3lmin"
    John's mum's office is "maktabu ummi John"
     
    You should see that the noun we want to refer to is the first term in the idaafa. Nouns in the middle of an idaafa directly possess the noun that precedes it. Finally, you may have noticed some funny case endings/lack of tanwin or definite article in some of the terms. Unfortunately idaafa's in Arabic follow a strict set of rules.
     
    Rules
    1) The first term in an idaafa is in the case that any normal noun would be if it were placed in that point of a sentence. Ie if an idaafa is an object of a verb then the first term is in the accusative, if the idaafa is followed by a preposition then it is in the genitive, if the idaafa is the subject of an equational it is in the nominative etc etc...
     
    2) All other nouns in the idaaf (ie not the first) must be in the genitive case
     
    3) Only the last noun in an idaafa can have tanwin (to signify it's indefinite) or an added alif at the start to show that it is definite. If the last noun in an idaafa has tanwin then the entire idaafa is indefinite and if the last noun has an added alif then the entire idaafa is definite. Ie
     
    A university professor's book is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin" -- also (a book of a professor of a university)
    The university professor's book "kitaabu ustaadhi al-jaami3ati" -- also (the book of the professor of the university)
     
    4) Adjectives describing terms in the idaafa cannot be wedged in between nouns of an idaafa. These must come at the end and must agree with the noun it describes in case, gender, pluarity, definiteness etc. Ie
    A big book of a small professor of a university is "kitaabu ustaadhi jaami3atin sagheerin kabirun"  
    You can also see that nouns which are written later on are described before those written earlier.
     
    If I made an mistakes please let me know. 
    Next post should be about: Rules of verb-subject agreement (jumlat fi3liya/ismiya)
  20. Haha
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Which type of birth is better for women?   
    y r u worrying about this ur not even married lol
  21. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Cubster's Eating Records   
    strength exercises (such as for abs) have more advantages than just making you look healthy
  22. Like
    superman got a reaction from Mo- in Economics as Religion   
    As I mentioned I've been listening to Thomas Sowell Basic Economics and this is the impression that book gives me (attached in image)
     
     
    As far as economics being a religion - I dunno, a lot of the stuff he says actually makes a lot of sense. There is a lot of logical thinking involved and it doesn't sound like pseudoscience. 
     
    (Black circle should be renamed "Useful Goods". One thing Sowell says is that a lot of resources can be wasted in producing unneeded items. In capitalism this unnecessary production of goods results in losses.

  23. Like
    superman got a reaction from Breeze in Illustration of why socialism doesn't work   
    Communism can work very well and is an excellent system... just not for humans. Communism is the system enlisted by colonies of bees or ants in order to make their hives operate at great efficiency, and I think it works really well for them. Every bee just gets on with the specialisation nature intended for it. People on the other hand are ambitious and have self interests. I don't really think communism could ever work out for people like it does for other animals. 
  24. Like
    superman reacted to Mo- in Illustration of why socialism doesn't work   
     
    This is true, yet the government can provide a greater incentive for people to take these subjects. Say for example in British culture people didn't like maths, further financial incentive would tilt more people towards maths. There are ways the government can harness the free market because in the real world there isn't perfect information which is generally a requirement for a free market to exist. Students could be told "studying art history is a great career!" by teachers when in reality not that many people with art history degrees get the chance to work in anything meaningful. Has this information been available to them before they'd likely have made different life choices. 
     
     
    University has several other benefits even professional qualifications like the CPA or CFA or CS can't fill (even though they can provide credibility). Firstly, they show an extended determination and interest in the subject,  3-4 years isn't a short commitment. Secondly, they show the student can interact with people from different backgrounds. Thirdly, they show, for the most part, some sense of independence. Fourthly, most students will complete a research project or dissertation in their final year, which in many degrees (e.g. Engineering or medicine) can require the use of complex practical equipment that costs thousands of pounds. 
  25. Like
    superman got a reaction from Mo- in Illustration of why socialism doesn't work   
     
    At the end of the day I feel as if there are far fewer uni places then students so they can all afford to charge 9k. They all charge 9k because everyone can afford 9k thanks to the SLC. The SLC is basically a 0 risk loan for the student meaning that they can do any subject they wish. Obviously, this leads to price inflation, Unis realise that even when charging the maximum (9k) they will ALWAYS find students.
     
    However imagine if there was no SLC, then no one would be able to afford the massive fees except rich students. By charging rich students extortionate prices perhaps unis would be able to eventually increase the supply of education, lowering prices? Not only that but perhaps prices would come down naturally as Unis don't want to miss out on the massive customer base (poor/middle class students)
     
    Furthermore, resources won't be wasted on degrees with zero ROI (mickey mouse degrees) and instead those resources will go into funding STEM subjects (again increasing the supply of these subjects). As a result of a free market system, less people will have degrees but the value of a degree will go up.
     
    Infact, MSc degrees (in Physics anyway) can be as low as 5.5k. This is lower than the 9k charged per annum for undergraduate degrees. Furthermore the MSc runs from September to September, whereas the 9k in a undergrad degree only takes you from September to June. MSc degrees do seem to face some kind of pricing regulation but I don't think it is to the same degree experienced by BSc degrees.
     
     
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