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Actions Which Nullify the Fast

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Actions Which Nullify the Fast

The following acts, when done knowingly and deliberately in the days of Ramadhan, will invalidate the fast. In addition to being considered great sins, a person committing one of these acts will have to continue fasting the rest of the day that he/she committed it, and he/she is also required to take certain measures of reconciliation as indicated below.

1-Intentional eating, drinking

 

Allah says [in the meaning of]: "Eat and drink until the white thread becomes distinct to you from the black thread of the dawn. Then strictly observe the fast until nightfall." [al-Baqara, 2:187].

 

This applies to the one who does so consciously. However, if a person eats or drinks forgetfully or accidently or is forced to do it, the fasting is intact, the day is not to be made up and the person should continue fasting.

 

Abu Hurairah reported that the Prophet (S) said:"Whoever forgets he is fasting, and eats or drinks is to complete his fast, as it is Allah who fed him and gave him something to drink." [bukhari, Muslim and others]

 

Ibn Abbas reported that the Prophet (S) said:" Allah has excused for my Ummah mistakes, forgetfulness and what they are forced to do". [Tahawee, al-Hakim and Daraqutni; Sahih].

 

Similar to eating and drinking is smoking [besides being prohibited in itself] and letting any substance into the stomach.

 

However, if a person eats or drink out of forgetfulness, then he/she should continue fasting and the day fasted is valid and counted and does not need to make up the day. This is based on the hadith of Abu Huraira in Sahih al-Bukhari: The Prophet said, "If somebody eats or drinks forgetfully then he should complete his fast, for what he has eaten or drunk, has been given to him by Allah.".

 

Similarly if a person breaks the fast before the actual maghrib (sunset) or after fajr because of a mistake in time recognition, he is not to make up the day.

2-Sexual intercourse

 

Just like eating and drinking Allah has forbidden sexual intercourse during the days of Ramadan;

 

"Permitted to you, on the night of the fasts, is the approach to your wives. They are your garments and ye are their garments. Allah knows what you used to do secretly among yourselves; but He turned to you and forgave you; so now associate (i.e. have sexual intercourse) with them, and seek what Allah Hath ordained for you (i.e. offspring), and eat and drink, until the white thread of dawn appear to you distinct from its black thread; then complete your fast till the night appears; but do not associate with your wives while you are in seclusion (I`tikaf) in the mosques. Those are Limits (set by) Allah. Approach not nigh thereto. Thus does Allah make clear His Signs to men: that they may learn self-restraint. [al-Baqara; 2:187]

 

The `ulama' [scholars] differ about stimulating oneself [whether alone or with his wife or vise versa], without intercourse, to the point of ejaculation. Some of them treat it as complete intercourse, while others say that it does not invalidate the fast even though it causes a loss of its rewards.

3-Intentional vomiting

 

Abu Hurairah reported that the Prophet (S) said :"Whoever is overcome and vomits is not to make up the day. Whoever vomits intentionally must make up the day." [Ahmad, Abu Dawud, at-Tirmithi and Ibn Majah; Sahih]

4-Poor Intentions

 

Failing to intend (i.e. with the heart) to fast from before the dawn of the day of fast. (Note: voluntary or nafl fasting is excepted from this requirement)

 

Intending to stop fasting at any moment during the day of fast. These last two actions are actions of the heart and are related to the intention which has been shown as being an essential element [or pillar] of fasting. These actions void the fast even if the person does not actually eat anything. This is because the intention is one of the pillars of the fast and, if one changes his/her intention, he/she has nullified his/her fast.

 

Except intercourse, a day invalidated by such an action cannot be atoned by even fasting the whole life. Thus, in addition to the qadha' [making up the day], the only way to atone such an act is by true and sincere repentance and strong determination never to do it.

 

The only action, according to most scholars, which requires that both the day be made up and the act of expiation be performed is having sexual intercourse during a day of Ramadan.

 

Abu Hurairah reported that a man came to the Messenger of Allah and said: "I am destroyed, 0 Messenger of Allah!" The Prophet asked: "What has destroyed you?" He said, "I had intercourse with my wife during a day of Ramadan." The Prophet asked: "Are you able to free a slave?" He said, "No". The Prophet asked: "Is it possible for you to fast for two consecutive months?" He said, "No." The Prophet asked: "Is it possible for you to feed sixty poor people?" He said, "No." The Prophet said: "Then sit." A basket of dates was brought to the Prophet and he said to the man: Give this in charity. The man said: "To someone poorer than us? There is no one in this city who is poorer than us!" The Prophet laughed until his molar teeth could be seen and said: "Go and feed your family with it." [bukhari, Muslim and others]

 

Most scholars say that both men and women have to perform the acts of expiation (Kaffarah) if they intentionally have intercourse during a day of Ramadan on which they had intended to fast.

5-Injections containing nourishment

 

Though this type of action is committed intentionally and thus falls under intentional eating and drinking, it is not considered as a sin if given to a sick person in need of it. All what is needed is to make up the day later. These injections are meant to give nourishment intravenously so that it reaches the intestines, with the intention of nourishing the sick person. Also if the injection reaches the blood-stream then it likewise breaks the fast since it is being used in place of food and drink. Similar is the use of drips containing glucose and saline solutions, and inhalers used by people sick of asthma. May Allah relieve all sick believers.

 

Involuntarily events that break the fast

 

The fast is disrupted (and there is no point or reward then in continuing to fast) when a woman sees the blood caused by either of:

 

1-Menstruation

2-post-childbirth bleeding

 

Even if such bleeding begins just before the sunset, the fast of that day is rendered invalid. A woman in this case will have to fast a day later (qadha') for every day (or part of day) that she missed.

 

If a menstruating woman becomes Tahira (ceases bleeding) before dawn, then she takes her Ghusl (purifying shower) and intends to fast the next day. However, if she becomes Tahira after fajr then she takes her ghusl, and starts praying as usual and the day has to made up after Ramadan. She may eat and drink during that day as it is an invalid day as Shaikh Ibn Otheimin observed.

 

The Prophet (S) said: "Is it not that when she [the woman] menstruates, she does not pray nor fast?" We said : Yes indeed. He said: "That is the deficiency in her Deen [religion]. In another narration: "She remains not praying at night and refraining from fasting in Ramadan, that is the deficiency in her Deen".[Muslim]

 

The order to make up for the days of menstruation is reported in the lesson `Aishah gave to Mu`aathah who came and asked her "Why is it that the menstruating woman has to make up her fasts but not the prayers?" `Aisha said: "Are you a Harooree(*) woman?" I (Mu`aathah) said: "I am not a Harooree woman, but I wish to ask". `Aisha said: "That used to come upon us and so we were ordered to make up the fasts and were never ordered to make up the prayers" [bukhari and Muslim]

 

(*)Haroorees are the people of Haroora near Koofa [iraq]. They had the belief of Khawarij who fought Ali radhiya Allahu `anh. They make it obligatory on the woman to make up her prayers if she menstruates. `Aisha feared that Mu`aathah was among them.

 

 

A bro sent this to me... and I thought it was pretty cool.. as it covers a good variety of topics.. alhamdulillah..

 

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What about when a woman is menstruating but she still doesn't eat - she still fasts but not properly.

Is that allowed?

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If she has the intention to fast while menstruating, her fast won't count it will be invalid and she will just be making herself hungry for no reason. She should make up the fasts she missed after Ramadan.

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The thing is, there is nothing to be gained from not eating anything if a woman is menstruating - there's a reason she's allowed to eat, so she should. If she doesnt eat, or she fasts, she wont be rewarded for it, she'll just be starving herself and making her menstruating days more difficult upon herself.

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What does it mean to "not make up the prayers" but make up the fast?

I mean u do need to pray in order to make up the fast...

 

I'm Confused.

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What does it mean to "not make up the prayers" but make up the fast?

I mean u do need to pray in order to make up the fast...

 

I'm Confused.

 

It means that these conditions only break the fast, they do not invalidate the prayer (except for some of the said conditions), you don't have to make up the prayers you did on the specific day [if you performed them correctly]. You only have to make up the fast, and of course pray the 5 daily prayers on that day.

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^Prayers that one has missed due to menstruation are not needed to be made-up. Only fasts must be made up. And a fast without prayers is... just starving one's self.

 

edit: Outposted by Facey. :P!

 

********

 

I recieved an email which I thought was a useful reminder for all of us; starting with me. I hope you don't mind me posting this, Brother Noor:

 

Mistakes During Ramadan

 

Too much stress on food and drink

For some people, the entire month of Ramadaan revolves around food. They

spend the ENTIRE day planning, cooking, shopping and thinking about only

food, instead of concentrating on Salaah, Qur'aan and other acts of worship.

All they can think of is FOOD. So much so that they turn the month of

'fasting' into the month of 'feasting'.

Come Iftaar time, their table is a sight to see, with the multitudes and

varieties of food, sweets and drinks. They are missing the very purpose of

fasting, and thus, increase in their greed and desires instead of learning

to control them. It is also a kind of waste & extravagance. 'and eat and

drink but waste not by extravagance, certainly He (Allaah) likes not

Al-Musrifoon (those who waste by extravagance)' [al-A'raaf :31]

 

Spending all day cooking

Some of the sisters (either by their own choice or forced by their husbands)

are cooking ALL day and ALL night, so that by the end of the day, they are

too tired to even pray Ishaa, let alone pray Taraweeh, Tahajjud or read

Quraan, etc.

 

Eating too much

Some people stuff themselves at Suhoor until they are ready to burst,

because they think this is the way to not feel hungry during the day and

some people eat at Iftaar, like there is no tomorrow, trying to 'make up for

the food missed.' However, this is completely against the Sunnah. Moderation

is the key to everything.

 

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'The son of Adam does not fill any vessel worse

than his stomach; for the son of Adam a few mouthfuls are sufficient to keep

his back straight. If you must fill it, then one-third for food, one-third

for drink and one-third for air.' (Tirmidhi, Ibn Maajah. Classed as saheeh

by al-Albaani).

 

Too much food distracts a person from many deeds of obedience and worship,

makes him lazy and also makes the heart heedless. It was said to Imam Ahmad:

Does a man find any softness and humility in his heart when he is full? He

said, I do not think so.

 

Sleeping all day

Some people spend their entire day (or a major part of it) 'sleeping away

their fast'. Is this what is really required of us during this noble month?

These people also are missing the purpose of fasting and are slaves to their

desires of comfort and ease.. They cannot 'bear' to be awake and face a

little hunger or exert a little self-control.

For a fasting person to spend most of the day asleep is nothing but,

negligence on his part.

 

Wasting time

Other people waste away their day playing video games, or worse still,

watching TV, movies or even listening to music. Subhaan Allaah! Trying to

obey Allaah by DISOBEYING him!

 

Fasting but not giving up evil

Some of us fast but do not give up lying, cursing, fighting, backbiting,

etc. and some of us fast but do not give up cheating, stealing, dealing in

haraam, buying lotto tickets, selling alcohol, fornication, etc. and we

think we are sooooo good.

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Whoever does not give up false speech and acting

upon it, and ignorance, Allaah has no need of him giving up his food and

drink.' (Bukhaari)

 

Smoking

Smoking is forbidden in Islam whether during Ramadaan or outside of it, as

it is one of al-Khabaa'ith (evil things).(This includes ALL eg. cigars,

cigarettes, pipes,'Sheesha' ,etc.)

'he allows them as lawful At Tayyibaat (all good and lawful things), and

prohibits them as unlawful Al Khabaa'ith (all evil and unlawful things)

[al-A'raaf :157]

 

It is harmful, not only to the one smoking, but also to the ones around

him. It is also a means of wasting ones wealth..

 

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'There should be no harming or reciprocating harm.'

 

This is especially true during fasting and it invalidates the fast. (Fatwa

-Ibn 'Uthaymeen)

 

Skipping Suhoor

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Eat suhoor for in suhoor there is

blessing.'(Bukhaari, Muslim).

And he (pbuh) said: 'The thing that differentiates between our fasting and

the fasting of the People of the Book is eating suhoor.' (Muslim)

 

Stopping Suhoor at 'Imsaak'

Some people stop eating Suhoor 10-15 minutes

earlier than the time of Fajr to observe 'Imsaak'. Shaykh Ibn 'Uthaymeen

said: This is a kind of bid'ah (innovation) which has no basis in the

Sunnah. Rather the Sunnah is to do the opposite. Allaah allows us to eat

until dawn:

'and eat and drink until the white thread (light) of dawn appears to you

distinct from the black thread (darkness of night)' [al-Baqarah 2:187]

And the Prophet (pbuh) said: '....eat and drink until you hear the adhaan

of Ibn Umm Maktoom, for he does not give the adhaan until dawn comes.'

 

This 'imsaak' which some of the people do is an addition to that which

Allaah has enjoined, so it is false. It is a kind of extremism in religion,

and the Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Those who go to extremes are doomed, those who

go to extremes are doomed, those who go to extremes are doomed.' (Muslim)

 

Not fasting if they missed Suhoor - Very Important

Some people are too scared to fast if they miss Suhoor. However, this is a

kind of cowardice and love of ease. What is the big deal if you missed a few

morsels of food? It's not like you will die. Remember, obedience to Allaah

overcomes everything.

 

Saying the intention to fast 'out loud' or saying a specific dua to start

fasting

The intention is an action of the heart. The Muslim should resolve in his

heart that he is going to fast tomorrow. It is not prescribed for him by the

Shari'ah to say out loud, 'I intend to fast', 'I will fast tomorrow' or

other phrases that have been innovated by some people. All he needs to do is

to resolve in his heart that he is going to fast tomorrow.

 

Also, there is no specific dua to be recited at the time of starting the

fast in the correct Sunnah. Whatever 'dua' you may see on some papers or

Ramadaan calendars is a Bid'ah.

 

Delaying breaking fast

Some people wait until the adhaan finishes or even several minutes after

that, just to be 'on the safe side'. However, the Sunnah is to hasten to

break the fast, which means breaking fast right after the sun has set.

 

Aa'ishah said: This is what the Messenger of Allaah (pbuh) used to do.

(Muslim)

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'The people will continue to do well so long as

they hasten to break the fast.' (Bukhaari, Muslim)

 

Determine to the best of your ability, the accuracy of your clock,

calendar, etc. and then have tawakkul on Allaah and break your fast exactly

on time.

 

Missing the golden chance of having your Dua accepted

The prayer of the fasting person is guaranteed to be accepted at the time of

breaking fast.

 

The Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Three prayers are not rejected: the prayer of a

father, the prayer of a fasting person, and the prayer of a traveler.'

(al-Bayhaqi, saheeh by al-Albaani).

 

Instead of sitting down and making Dua at this precious time, some people

forego this beautiful chance, and are too busy talking, setting the food,

filling their plates and glasses, etc. Food is more important to them than

the chance to have their sins forgiven or the fulfillment of their Duas.

 

Fasting but not praying

The fasting of one who does not pray WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. This is because

not praying constitutes kufr as the Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Between a man and

shirk and kufr there stands his giving up prayer.' (Muslim)

 

In fact, NONE of his good deeds will be accepted; rather, they are all

annulled.

'Whoever does not pray 'Asr, his good deeds will be annulled.' (Bukhaari)

 

 

Not fasting because of exams or work

Exams or work is NOT one of the excuses allowed by the Shari'ah to not fast.

You can do your studying and revision at night if it is too hard to do that

during the day. Also remember that pleasing and obeying Allaah is much more

important than 'good grades'.

 

Mixing fasting and dieting

DO NOT make the mistake of fasting with the intention to diet. That is one

of the biggest mistakes some of us make (esp. sisters). Fasting is an act of

worship and can only be for the sake of Allah alone. Mixing it with the

intention of dieting is a form of Shirk.

 

Fighting over the number of Raka'ah of Taraweeh

There is no specific number of rak'ahs for Taraweeh prayer, rather it is

permissible to do a little or a lot. Both 8 and 20 are okay.

Shaykh Ibn 'Uthaymeen said: 'No one should be denounced for praying eleven

or twenty-three (raka'ah), because the matter is broader in scope than that,

praise be to Allaah.'

 

Praying ONLY on the night of the 27th

Some people pray ONLY on the 27th to seek Lailat ul-Qadr, neglecting all

other odd nights, although the Prophet (pbuh) said: 'Seek Lailat ul-Qadr

among the odd numbered nights of the last ten nights of Ramadaan.'

(Bukhaari, Muslim).

 

 

 

***

I have a question: Is covering your feet an absolute must, or compulsory for prayers?

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edit: Outposted by Facey. :P !

 

***

I have a question: Is covering your feet an absolute must, or compulsory for prayers?

B)

 

Well some scholars say yes, some say no. You should contact your local sheikh and ask him.

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Saying the intention to fast 'out loud' or saying a specific dua to start

fasting

The intention is an action of the heart. The Muslim should resolve in his

heart that he is going to fast tomorrow. It is not prescribed for him by the

Shari'ah to say out loud, 'I intend to fast', 'I will fast tomorrow' or

other phrases that have been innovated by some people. All he needs to do is

to resolve in his heart that he is going to fast tomorrow.

 

Also, there is no specific dua to be recited at the time of starting the

fast in the correct Sunnah. Whatever 'dua' you may see on some papers or

Ramadaan calendars is a Bid'ah.

 

I would disagree, as the du'a that is commonly printed to be said at the start of the fast is taken from Sunan Abu Dawud, so to call it a bid'ah is plain wrong. It has also been recorded that when the Prophet (SAWS) would wake up and want to a keep a nawafil fast he would say "I am fasting".

 

But it should be mentioned that verbally claiming your intention to fast is not a prerequisite for the fast to be valid.

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Maria: not if you're Hanafi.

 

I yelled at my little brother the other day. Am I screwed......oooh snap.

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The thing is, there is nothing to be gained from not eating anything if a woman is menstruating - there's a reason she's allowed to eat, so she should. If she doesnt eat, or she fasts, she wont be rewarded for it, she'll just be starving herself and making her menstruating days more difficult upon herself.

 

If she has the intention to fast while menstruating, her fast won't count it will be invalid and she will just be making herself hungry for no reason. She should make up the fasts she missed after Ramadan.

 

Jazakallah - I know alot of women who do this, I've always wondered if it was right.

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Jazakallah - I know alot of women who do this, I've always wondered if it was right.

 

I used to do that too...if my fast broke in the middle of the day, I used to carry on with my fasting because I thought this would earn me more points with Allah. But now I know that the reason we don't have to fast is for our benefit, so why do I carry on doing something that ALlah has said I don't need to? Now if my fast breaks during the day I make sure I go drink something at least and have a piece of fruit in the day to kepe my energy up :)

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Saying the intention to fast 'out loud' or saying a specific dua to start

fasting

The intention is an action of the heart. The Muslim should resolve in his

heart that he is going to fast tomorrow. It is not prescribed for him by the

Shari'ah to say out loud, 'I intend to fast', 'I will fast tomorrow' or

other phrases that have been innovated by some people. All he needs to do is

to resolve in his heart that he is going to fast tomorrow.

 

Also, there is no specific dua to be recited at the time of starting the

fast in the correct Sunnah. Whatever 'dua' you may see on some papers or

Ramadaan calendars is a Bid'ah.

Is this true??? I was taught in madressah, along with every single Muslim I know, that there are specific duas to recite on making and breaking the fast. Yes, your intention needs to be there too but we were taught and so always read the duas for fasting.

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Is this true??? I was taught in madressah, along with every single Muslim I know, that there are specific duas to recite on making and breaking the fast. Yes, your intention needs to be there too but we were taught and so always read the duas for fasting.

I couldn't find a dua for starting a fast. What is this dua, so we can search for it.

At the same time, declaring as bida the dua when beginning fast seems like extreme.

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