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Wisdoms from Other Cultures

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Yes good thread!

 

My dad often says:

Arab saying:

'Lee fait mat', (I know it sounds like: (le fat mate) but no, in Arabic it's beautiful...

Literal meaning:

'The passed has died',

meaning what is done, is done.

 

 

My mum often says:

A french saying,

 

You cannot have the butter and the money of the butter.

'Tu peux pas avoir le beurre et l'argent du beurre.'

 

In English I believe it will be :

'You cannot have your cake and eat it'... which I find stupid,

Who would want to have a cake just to stare at it all day :blink:

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It is very simple smurfette, you have a cake (to give to someone) or you eat it.

 

PS. reminds me of the binary joke, there are two types of people, those who get it and those who don't. :lol:

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My mum always said this to me, never got what it means though.

 

Nin isfaaniye waa riis nugtay: A man who boasts about his own achievements is a suckling goat.

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I think it means:

 

A man who boasts of his achievements is a kid who gets his nourishment(ie he needs it) from the attention/praise of others.

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But you can do both! There is no logic behind it... :blink:

 

:lol:at your ps...I clearly don't

binary code is basically series of 1's and 0's. They refer to a series of "on" or "off" commands. Thus those that get the joke are "on" and those that do not are "off".

 

^_^

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If you speak the truth then have a foot in the stirrup. Turkish proverb.

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can we get this transliterated?

 

Yeppers

 

It goes 'cruka khlu, sook samie'..

(literally: crooked mouth, punch fixes it)

 

My dad actually told me it in context of a girl we know who is going through an unfortunate marriage and is on the brink of divorce. He's refusing counselling, so my dad offered to have 5 minutes in a room alone with him to give him all the 'counselling' he needs- then told me of this proverb!

 

By the way- Mr Pomak- don't you have any popular Eastern European ones to offer up?

 

Guyanese sayings are very wise, but SO vulgar. not sure if i should post. O_O

 

Please do- but perhaps spoiler it or filter out the super-explicit ones :P

Are Guyanese generally much more open about stuff that others may find vulgar or too much? I ask because the kinds of phrases/idioms usually show how relaxed/uptight certain cultures are about things.

 

that's not a wisdome. An idiom maybe, not a wisdom.

 

Am not differentiating here- a 'wisdom' can come from an idiom, it doesn't necessarily have to be a proverb or maxim.

 

yes, but the bottom part should be more 'pregnant' and the mouth should be smaller. Traditionally in south asia, water was stored in these.

 

Now the wise-crack proverb:

literal: Water in a full matki doesn't splish-splosh (there is a proper word for splish splosh)

intended meaning: A wholesome/cultured person is quietude - doesn't speak much.

 

background: if you half fill one of those, and move it a little, you hear a lot of splish-splosh inside. But if you fill it to the brim, water remains very calm.

 

PS> found it!

pot3.jpg

 

Interesting.........do you think it's kinda similar to the 'an empty vessel makes the most noise' proverb in English?

 

Andhon mei kaana raja.

A one-eyed fellow is always the King when amidst blind men.

 

This sounds identical English 'in the land of the blind, the one eyed man in king'. But maybe it's origins are Indian and it's just been naturalised into the English language.

 

Bandar kya jaaney adrak ka swaad.

What does a monkey know of the taste of ginger?

Meaning : One who cannot understand, cannot appreciate.

 

I love this! Esp as somebody who only started appreciating ginger recently!

 

_____________________________

 

 

Do you guys all know the locquat tree? Or fruit?

 

oldmen1.jpg

 

We have an expression in Pashtu which (referring to locquat) says 'trees which bear fruit, hang low'.

Meaning: People who are gifted with true knowledge/wisdom (fruit) are accessible to the people who can benefit from it. The other part of the proverb is that fruit-less trees stand haughty and tall- i.e.: nobody can ever reach nor benefit from them.

 

I really love that..

 

A while ago I read up a Jamaican proverb which Gai Eaton (rahimuhullah) mentioned which goes 'donkey say the world no level'.

Meaning: Even to the 'dumbest' creature, we know the world is created on injustice/inequality.

 

Keep them coming guys- this is really interesting.

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Am not differentiating here- a 'wisdom' can come from an idiom, it doesn't necessarily have to be a proverb or maxim.

some idioms could contain wisdom which we are sharing now. but that one is used for analogical purposes.

e.g. for no wisdom idioms

from pot to stove - situation changed from bad to worst - anology, no wisdom

fits like a glove, - perfect fit - anology, no wisdom

itchy ass no nails - zim have bad taste (and probably no nails)

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Indian proverb:

 

Having a daughter is like watering your neighbour's garden.

Meaning: Your daughters are an investment into somebody else's household which you will never enjoy the 'fruits' of.

 

Indian du'a for somebody you like:

'May you have all sons!'

 

Meaning: Self explanatory jahilliyah.

 

 

Yikes, all that together with the sex-change operation thread really does show such alarming ignorance and backward attitudes in parts of India today.

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some idioms could contain wisdom which we are sharing now. but that one is used for analogical purposes.

e.g. for no wisdom idioms

from pot to stove - situation changed from bad to worst - anology, no wisdom

fits like a glove, - perfect fit - anology, no wisdom

itchy ass no nails - zim have bad taste (and probably no nails)

 

I understand what you mean. My point is though, that whilst not all idioms have 'wisdoms' to them- some do- so just on the criteria of them being an idiom I wouldn't exclude it entirely.

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Indian proverb:

 

Having a daughter is like watering your neighbour's garden.

Meaning: Your daughters are an investment into somebody else's household which you will never enjoy the 'fruits' of.

 

Indian du'a for somebody you like:

'May you have all sons!'

 

Meaning: Self explanatory jahilliyah.

 

 

Yikes, all that together with the sex-change operation thread really does show such alarming ignorance and backward attitudes in parts of India today.

 

 

Yep. All these have roots in ancient India where situation was despicably unimaginable, especially in the Hindu traditions. Sadly, some people never progressed. If I may suggest, you must definitely check out this Indian movie called 'Water' by Meera Nair. It shows how widows were treated like God's rejected children after their husbands died. They were not allowed to mingle with the common folk, not even allowed to touch them 'cuz they weren't 'pure' anymore. Also, they were made to go bald and thrown in to a widow-house of sorts and basically, treated like crap and turned into prostitutes. Oh, and yeah the same didn't apply for a man who lost his wife. Imagine that.

 

Anyway, back to topic :

 

 

Naach na jaaney , aangan terha

One who cannot dance, says the stage is crooked.

 

Aap bhaley toh jag bhalaa

Now I am not really sure, this could mean either of the following :

a ) If you're good to others, others are good to you.

b ) When a person is of an inherently good nature and disposition, he sees the same in others.

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It goes 'cruka khlu, sook samie'..

(literally: crooked mouth, punch fixes it)

 

btw is it dari or pashtu.

 

As for eastern European sayings, unfortunately my mother was very much a pro assimilation type of person so I barely can even speak the language. I actually remember my dad telling me some but I couldn't understand them. :ph34r:

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Yep. All these have roots in ancient India where situation was despicably unimaginable, especially in the Hindu traditions. Sadly, some people never progressed. If I may suggest, you must definitely check out this Indian movie called 'Water' by Meera Nair. It shows how widows were treated like God's rejected children after their husbands died. They were not allowed to mingle with the common folk, not even allowed to touch them 'cuz they weren't 'pure' anymore. Also, they were made to go bald and thrown in to a widow-house of sorts and basically, treated like crap and turned into prostitutes. Oh, and yeah the same didn't apply for a man who lost his wife. Imagine that.

 

Thanks for this Miah, I'll definately check it out! I recently watched a documentary about Devadasis on Channel 4 and that was all about women being 'married' in service to a goddess and so unable to ever marry themselves, but were able to be good prostitute material which is how they made their living. If hearing of things like that doesn't make you say alhamdulillah for Islam 50 bajillion times, I don't know what would!

 

Anyway, back to topic :

 

 

Naach na jaaney , aangan terha

One who cannot dance, says the stage is crooked.

 

Just like 'a bad workman blames his tools' right?

I love how there are so many parallel phrases/expressions between cultures. Just goes to show how consistent human nature is across time and place!

 

Aap bhaley toh jag bhalaa

Now I am not really sure, this could mean either of the following :

a ) If you're good to others, others are good to you.

b ) When a person is of an inherently good nature and disposition, he sees the same in others.

 

Hey, this also reminds me of an Arabic/Islamic saying which goes 'be yourself beautiful and you will find the world full of beauty'. I read it in a book of tasawwuf a while back- basically a reminder that EVERYTHING (good and bad) is out there, but depending on which eyes we use to see the world, we'll come to different conclusions..

 

Keep 'em coming Miah, yours are brilliant masha'Allah..

 

btw is it dari or pashtu.

 

As for eastern European sayings, unfortunately my mother was very much a pro assimilation type of person so I barely can even speak the language. I actually remember my dad telling me some but I couldn't understand them. :ph34r:

 

Oh the shame of it Pom Pom! When you lose a language, you've lost the core of a whole culture and history! Weep tears o'fire Bruce!

It's Pashtu :)

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