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Wisdoms from Other Cultures

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Oh my gosh this is hilarious- is a baboon in Afrikaans a 'bobbejaan'-?! :wow:

That would seriously make my life- esp since in Farsi (and I'm sure Urdu) 'jaan' is considered a term of endearment!

 

Do you speak/understand Afrikaans Cubinder?

lol yes, a 'bobbejaan' is baboon is Afrikaans. But the 'j' is pronounced like a 'y'. Its a wonky language, 'v' is pronounced like an 'f', 'w' is pronounced like a 'v'... :wacko:

 

And yes, in Urdu (this is one of the few words I know :P ) 'jaan' is a term of endearment :)

 

I speak and understand Afrikaans quite well. I grew up thinking I was one of them whiteys :P

I'm not as fluent as I used to be cos I don't speak it as much as I used to tho :/

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From the ones you listed there, it seems like a lot of these proverbs are to do with how people deal with each other- i.e.: advising people to be smart with others and mindful of the consequences of their actions. Sounds like a much more people/community-orientated culture (if that makes sense :/)

 

BTW- yo dutty ones weren't too bad, they were just all based around the toilet functions that's all ;)

 

i censored out the REALLY bad ones.

 

and yeah guyanese people are very community-oriented. aka all very much up in each others' business. it's wonderful.

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Sabr ka pahl (or was it poohl?) meeta hota hai

 

Something along the lines of the reward for being patient is sweet. Somebody else translate it!

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nanga naache paate kya?

when you dance naked, what (cloth) is there to tear?

 

meaning that if you have no baggage/skeletons in the closet, then you can be uninhibited and you have nothing to hide.

 

i don't even know what language that is. i know its some sort of desi language, but which one, i don't know. my dad said his mom used to say it.

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Sabr ka pahl (or was it poohl?) meeta hota hai

 

Something along the lines of the reward for being patient is sweet. Somebody else translate it!

The fruits of patience are sweet.

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Sabr ka pahl (or was it poohl?) meeta hota hai

 

Something along the lines of the reward for being patient is sweet. Somebody else translate it!

 

Yeah the fruits of patience are sweet.

Zimarina- there's a fable that goes with chor ke daari me tilka, but literally it means 'the thief has yellow dye in his beard' which doesn't mean anything haha

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Yeah the fruits of patience are sweet.

Zimarina- there's a fable that goes with chor ke daari me tilka, but literally it means 'the thief has yellow dye in his beard' which doesn't mean anything haha

 

 

Lol, I always found this one funny. But nay, Sali-nana! I think it is 'Chor ki daarhi mei TINKA'.

Tinka = particles/bits of some kind. So going by your story, it probably means the chor had food in his beard.

Usually, you say this when someone is telling a lie but there's a flaw in their story and so you know they are lying! So you may go :

"AHA! You said you were st the drug store at noon on Sunday but all drug stores are closed on Sundays! CHOR KI DAARHI MEI TINKA!"

 

Ya know, something like that. lol_2.gif

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Haha, I'll share some conventional English wisdom.

 

All is grist that comes to the mill

Meaning: You can profit from anything, I think? My old teacher used to say it to us, meaning all things could be used as an advantage.

 

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy

Meaning: Pretty explanatory, I heard this so much as kid, ugh.

 

Beggars can't be choosers

Meaning: Self-exp. My Mum says this ALL the time.

 

Don't throw out the baby with the bathwater

Meaning: Okay I never got this as a kid, but it means not to disregard everything at once. It's obvious now I think about it.

 

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth, fools rush in where angels fear to tread, April showers bring forth May flowers, all roads lead to Rome, the devil finds work for idle hands. You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. You can't squeeze blood from a stone (I remember having a children's book revolving around this saying, lol!), the empty can makes the most noise... I don't know. Are English proverbs pretty universal? I don't think there's much left of our culture that's pure and unique.

 

And my fave: It is easy to be wise after the event. SO TRUE.

 

There are so many, honestly. I swear the older members of my family talk in riddles. Maybe that's why I'm decent linguistically.

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Don't throw out the baby with the bathwater

 

Oh, oh, oh, I think I know this one. It was something along the lines of back in the day when there was no running water and electricity and such, families would share bathwater or something gross like that. So it would start with the father and then move down the rungs. The baby was the last to get in the tub, and since the water was so filthy by that time one could easily lose sight of the baby and throw it out with the bathwater.

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Ah Miah you're right!

M dad used to always say 'don't teach your grandma to suck eggs' and as a kid I used to think how my grandma would actually go about sucking eggs.

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Wisdom:

 

Eat your green vegetables.

 

Source: Universal.

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'all ayuh tar wid de same brush'

all of you are tarred with with same brush.

meaning people who are alike stick together. kind of like birds of feather flock together.

 

'one rotten aloo spile de whole barrel'

one rotten potato spoils the whole barrel.

the exact same as the expression 'one rotten apple spoils the whole barrel', but we say potato instead.

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Oh, oh, oh, I think I know this one. It was something along the lines of back in the day when there was no running water and electricity and such, families would share bathwater or something gross like that. So it would start with the father and then move down the rungs. The baby was the last to get in the tub, and since the water was so filthy by that time one could easily lose sight of the baby and throw it out with the bathwater.

 

Yep! :)

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They aren't really Hindu. Just general Indian sayings. Such things are just regularly taught in schools. You'll hear them from all kinds of Indians on a regular basis. There are so many Indian sayings that mom and I love repeating.

 

"Bhains ke aage been bajana"

Literal: Playing the flute in front of a buffalo

You should tailor your speech according to the audience. Or ignorant people can't appreciate certain things.

 

"Ab Pachchtaye hoth kya jab chidiya chug gayi khet."

Literal: No use in having regrets after the birds have eaten away the farm.

Crying over spilt milk.

 

Samajhdaar ko ishara kafi hai.

Literal: A smart individual only requires a hint.

I see, thanks for pointing it out and for posting these. =)

 

7. Turtle cyaa walk if he nah push he head outa he shell.

translation: the turtle cannot walk if you does not push his head out of his shell.

explanation: you can't make any progress in life unless you take risks

B'aww, this one made me grin like an idiot at my screen. |3

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