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Cubby, congrats! And I discovered that living alone means you eat stuff like noodles a lot lol. It's just like why bother cooking it's just me? And my freezer is tiny I can't even keep much in there for a later date.

 

Thanks for the kind words. I am so eager to get started!

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BTW, I got accepted for a part-time position at my grad school, alhamdulilah. Good stuff cuz I won't have to take out any loans so long as I lead a poor student life, insha'Allah. I was very worried about this. Bad news cuz I'll have to speak in front of a room full of people :ph34r: Audhu billah!

 

Just kidding. I'm actually looking forward to it, hopefully as an opportunity to grow more comfortable speaking in front of gawking eyes (Please make du'a on this point). Also the topic is perfecto. And it should be a good way to determine whether I could ever be a teacher in the future. iA. Or if I should find some sort of job where one never has to communicate with those beings they call humans.

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Congrats guys! Wishing you all the best. I just finished my Masters and have some vague notions of applying for jobs but honestly I'm just so tired after a year of working + studying. I'll get to it soon....

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https://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2017/08/daily-chart

 

this means there is still a pay gap in the UK (0.5%), but that could be explainable through stuff like overtime, performance bonuses (stuff like commission, working for more lucrative clients), men being more likely to ask for a raise or retiring later (women tend to retire before men). 

 

Data like the above moves the debate to another issue: should employers accommodate women's life choices more? 

I think as the standard of living continues to improve, accommodation for lifestyle choices will be even more widely practiced. Top firms already establish daycare and nursery arrangements for their employees, allows people to take work home, etc., and I think we'll see this practice become more widespread. 

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I don't think its a matter of weather companies should or shouldn't accommodate women's life choices. If they really want a particular woman to work for them then they'll make those arrangements etc. It's just a matter of supply and demand.

 

If men are less hassel to employ (they don't get pregnant etc..) then that's what the market will favour naturally. 

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6 hours ago, superman said:

I don't think its a matter of weather companies should or shouldn't accommodate women's life choices. If they really want a particular woman to work for them then they'll make those arrangements etc. It's just a matter of supply and demand.

 

If men are less hassel to employ (they don't get pregnant etc..) then that's what the market will favour naturally. 

 

Yes but the opportunities for men and women are asymmetrical in a heterosexual relationship due to the fact it's the female who must carry the child, breastfeed and is the most suitable for reading in the early years. 

 

The benefits however are parallel: both the mother and the father gain a child, but the woman faces a higher cost, and multiple children of course multiply that cost. A woman could easily miss four years out of her career if she had two children within a year of each other, while the male in the relationship wouldn't have to miss anything. 

 

If a company has spent x amount of time and dollars training a woman, it could be better for them to retain her by making work conditions more flexible. I think most famously Goldman Sachs have a maternity flexibility scheme and a nursery/daycare for children up to 12 years old. 

 

I think an unwanted side effect of this though is your kids would say "I grew up at Goldman Sachs" lol. 

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On 2017/08/03 at 11:35 PM, superman said:

I don't think its a matter of weather companies should or shouldn't accommodate women's life choices. If they really want a particular woman to work for them then they'll make those arrangements etc. It's just a matter of supply and demand.

 

If men are less hassel to employ (they don't get pregnant etc..) then that's what the market will favour naturally. 

Most companies by nature are quite patriarchal in their structure and culture would tend to see those things as working in opposition to the company goals. They would expect the woman to put the company first (like they would with a male however, he, generally would not have a hard time doing this - generally not to say all males). And the idea is that women won't do this yet there are many career driven women who would. But due to the patriarchal structure and culture that dominates, this affects how they hire. Their perception of the candidate on paper may affect the perception in person and there would be underlying assumptions being made about a female candidate (just as there would be about a male candidate but the assumptions tend to favour one over the other). *Again, this is a generalisation and there are companies who move against the grain.

 

(Crap, the sentence disappeared and I can't remember exactly what I was saying here) Also, we need to acknowledge that these life choices are not always made independently. As Mo said, the woman has to carry the baby. This can happen because of various reasons. She either chose to have a baby or she may have been reluctant to but her partner wanted or insisted (and could have insisted that she have multiple children) so it may not be a life choice that she wanted to pursue at that time or something like that. I'm trying to say that its not solely always down to the woman, there are other factors to consider. 

 

That said, has anyone seen the work being done on growing foetuses outside the womb? I saw this video of scientists growing lambs to term outside the womb and the rationale is to help preemie babies, so if a mother can't carry to term they would move the foetus into this artificial womb (at least that was how I understood it). How long then before this turns into an active choice that women make which means they can still have babies but don't have to lose work from maternity leave or pregnancy related illnesses? I found this to be really interesting.

 

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