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I LOVE VEGATABLES!

 

As raw as I can get them- as I generally prefer crunch so if cooked then al dente or not at all. The process of cooking actually depletes a lot of the nutrients in vegetables, no?

 

So following on from the much-needed awareness-raising on our over-consumption of meat, let's make it easier for us to all become healthier, Sunnah-abiding, ethically sound Muzlamic vicegerents of the world.

 

Share your best vegetarian dishes, pictures, inspiration and recipes!

 

Tried and tested are most welcome- and ways we can make sure we have more all-veggie dishes on our dinner tables more often than we do already. Preferably things which the whole family can enjoy and with ingredients which are relatively easy to find too please!

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You had me at 'Vegetarian Love'!

 

I am my mother's daughter, I don't write/follow recipes. It's usually a little bit of this, a little bit of that... and you know how that goes.

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I like this mixed veg curry thing that I make. Basically you buy mixed veg from the store and you put it in the pot and make curry from it. Its yum.

 

Also, has anyone tried using Altantic Sea Salt in their cooking? I've started using it and gives the food a lovely flavour. The best part is that I don't use a lot of it in comparison to regular rough salt.

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The process of cooking actually depletes a lot of the nutrients in vegetables, no?

 

 

 

Not strictly true:

 

http://www.bbclifest...act-or-fiction/

MYTHS ABOUT FOOD

(...)

(...)

3. Fresh vegetables are much healthier than frozen varieties

Not always the case. Many frozen vegetables are often just as nutritious and sometimes more than fresh versions. The latter can loose much of their high vitamin and mineral content between being harvested and up to weeks of long-haul transportation across land, sea and air to the supermarket shelf. Frozen food manufacturers usually quick-freeze produce within hours of it being harvested, which minimises nutritional loss.

4. Cooking vegetables depletes their goodness

The notion that vegetables will loose all their goodness by cooking them is not strictly true. Granted, boiling them to a pulp will bleed them dry of nutrients, but gently steaming them will keep the majority of nutrients locked in. The fibres that are broken down during the cooking process can also make it easier for your body to absorb the goodness that the vegetables contain. In some instances, cooking vegetables can boost their healthy compounds. For example, ketchup, which contains cooked tomatoes, has up to six times more of the antioxidant lycopene than the same amount of raw tomatoes.

5. Colourless vegetables lack nutrition

Don’t judge the nutritious value of a vegetable by its colour – many pale vegetables are as packed full of goodness as vibrant-coloured ones. For example, white cabbage is a powerhouse of vitamins A, B C and K and is high in calcium, iron and fibre. And the trusty cauliflower is bursting with antioxidant power, despite its grubby appearance.

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I like this mixed veg curry thing that I make. Basically you buy mixed veg from the store and you put it in the pot and make curry from it. Its yum.

 

Also, has anyone tried using Altantic Sea Salt in their cooking? I've started using it and gives the food a lovely flavour. The best part is that I don't use a lot of it in comparison to regular rough salt.

 

this. Minus the weird salt stuff :P

 

and I like the tags :D

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YES PLEASE SHARE! I'm running out of ways to make veggies taste nice D:

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Fried aubergine (eggplant) delight

 

1 big aubergine would be enough for two people. cut aubergines in to thin strips. fry them until golden brown, taking care they don't burn.

set the fried strips on paper so the oil seeps out. Sprinkle salt on them for taste.

get a big onion or two (more the merrier), chop them fine. fry them until caramelized, but not until dry. Once caramalized, add termaric powder (half to one teaspoon), add curry powder (1 teaspoon), add suger (IMPORTANT 1 teaspoon at least!).

add chilli flakes or powder according to your threshold for pain. green chillies goes better than red ones, but this depends on your taste.

 

add the aubergines while the onions are hot, and mix thoroughly. taste to see if there is enough salt/spices for your taste. black pepper goes well too. freshly ground black pepper does wonders

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