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Anyone work in a lab before? In my opinion it's a hit or miss with people

 

I have. It was for a short internship. What do you mean by hit or miss?

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I have. It was for a short internship. What do you mean by hit or miss?

 

Oh cool dude, what did your work comprise of?

 

I did two summers in a lab and my work dealt with Sjogren's syndrome. Although it sharpened me, taught me much about the whole research process, and I learned how to do techniques such as Immunofluorescence, etc. I would never want to do it professionally.

 

It's either you like it or you don't, and frankly I would not want my life dependent on grants. That, and my mentor gave me a hard time so I eventually I did not look forward to work. On the contrary, some of my friends have had awesome mentors and their experience has been great.

 

Mine wasn't, so that's probably why I don't like it. I'm more people oriented anyway.

 

How was yours?

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Oh cool dude, what did your work comprise of?

 

I did two summers in a lab and my work dealt with Sjogren's syndrome. Although it sharpened me, taught me much about the whole research process, and I learned how to do techniques such as Immunofluorescence, etc. I would never want to do it professionally.

 

It's either you like it or you don't, and frankly I would not want my life dependent on grants. That, and my mentor gave me a hard time so I eventually I did not look forward to work. On the contrary, some of my friends have had awesome mentors and their experience has been great.

 

Mine wasn't, so that's probably why I don't like it. I'm more people oriented anyway.

 

How was yours?

 

It was only a couple of weeks and it involved a lot of molecular cell biology. I was assigned a phd student who I had to assist with her research. She was really nice actually, she showed me how to do everything and was really patient. She showed me how to use different machines like a cryostat and a laser microscope and I had to do a lot of experiments with loads of repeats. It was actually mind numbingly boring. I also carried out several PCR reactions and ran a lot of agarose gel electrophoresis.

 

I know I do want to go into research eventually (maybe not for a career forever) but I know for sure it's not going to be in the field of molecular biology -_- This was available and quite convenient, good for the CV so I did it.

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It was only a couple of weeks and it involved a lot of molecular cell biology. I was assigned a phd student who I had to assist with her research. She was really nice actually, she showed me how to do everything and was really patient. She showed me how to use different machines like a cryostat and a laser microscope and I had to do a lot of experiments with loads of repeats. It was actually mind numbingly boring. I also carried out several PCR reactions and ran a lot of agarose gel electrophoresis.

 

I know I do want to go into research eventually (maybe not for a career forever) but I know for sure it's not going to be in the field of molecular biology -_- This was available and quite convenient, good for the CV so I did it.

 

 

Oh word that's pretty cool, I didn't get to do any PCRs but did do electrophoresis like a bajillion times. The Western Blot was my best friend. Although you said that it was boring, you think you'll find a lab more interesting to you?

 

Ditto, it looks good for sure. Hmm now talking about it, I might want a different mentor

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/garret-loporto/surprising-way-your-neand_b_568455.html

 

Surprising Way Your Neanderthal Genes May Affect You

 

 

New DNA data reveals that many of us are carrying Neanderthal genes. And not only that, but evidence is mounting that when those genes are activated in you, they can cause you to become incredibly resourceful, pioneering, creative... and utterly out of control.

Scientists used to like to think that we come exclusively from a branch of human evolution called "Modern Humans." The thought that modern humans may have interbred with another species entirely -- the Neanderthals -- was viewed as unsavory heresy. That is until yesterday.

 

 

The traits of modern humans could be summed up as very traditional, stable, with a low capacity/tolerance for risk, innovation, change and progress. In short, they were temperamentally too stable and too disinclined towards free thought or creativity to make any recognizable progress over the first 163,000 years of their existence on this planet.

Modern humans were also trapped mostly in Africa because their rivals -- the Neanderthals -- occupied Europe and Asia and could basically kick the living crap out of them if they ever dared to venture into this Neanderthal territory, because Neanderthals were extremely combative, powerful, and skillful warriors. In fact, Neanderthals were the total opposite temperament of modern humans. Neanderthals were wild and relentlessly creative to a fault. They were innovative, but because they couldn't stop innovating, battling, and moving on to the next new thing they could not maintain any progress. Think of a tribe that was 100% ADHD and bipolar -- no stability -- complete and utter madness. Without any stability their abundant creations, breakthroughs and innovations would be short-lived and forgotten by subsequent generations.
Archaeological evidence demonstrates that Neanderthals made musical instruments. The book "Neanderthals Sing" explores their amazing propensity for singing -- even above language.
Then something miraculous happened. About 37,000 years ago Neanderthals likely intermingled with modern humans, because boom - all of a sudden there's a new gene in the human genome, the DRD4 7R gene -- which has been a prime suspect for originating from Neanderthals for some time now. This gene is associated with risk-taking, sensation-seeking and novelty-seeking, and correlated with openness to new experiences, intolerance to monotony, and exploratory behavior -- you know... Neanderthal stuff.
This miraculous combination created a new kind of "super" human hybrid tribe: part Neanderthal, part modern human -- and they DOMINATED. They had the battle skills and ingenuity of Neanderthals and the stability of modern humans working together to sustain their growth, progress and eventual dominion. Suddenly Earth was transformed -- virtually overnight evolutionarily speaking. Within the cosmic blink of an eye, mankind was creating and sustaining large civilizations fueled by innovations in language, agriculture, technology and culture. And this DRD4 7R gene is likely the cause.
. If you've got the active DRD4 7R gene - you're going to be risk-taking, creative, innovative and very hard to reign in - much like the Neanderthals. Let's call these people the UprisersSM. If you don't have it, you're going to be more stable and traditional -- much like the modern humans. Let's call these people the Stabilizers. So right now -- worldwide -- 10% of people are Uprisers, 90% are stabilizers.
If a typical Neanderthal lived in our society today they would most likely be labeled with ADHD, bipolar, Asperger's or autism. They would have addictive personalities causing them to go way over the top with whatever caught their passion. They would be seen as troublemakers in school and would quickly assume the role of misfit or rebel. So it is with those who still carry their genes.

Even in their day the Neanderthals must have recognized how the inherent ADHD of their disposition, while great for innovation and battle, really hampered their ability to sustain a stable life, because at their burial sites we've found ephedrine -- which is a drug similar in effect to Ritalin, Adderall and Concerta -- which stabilizes the brain thus reducing the symptoms of ADHD and bipolar suffered by less inhibited brains.
Stabilizers, to this day, tend to be very uncomfortable and feel threatened by Neanderthal traits. Those possessing Neanderthal traits (the Uprisers) are often rebuked, shamed and marginalized because they violate the norm. The tragic thing is that there seems to be something deep in the modern human psyche that abhors the Neanderthal genome -- literally an instinctive desire to genocide our Neanderthal lineage. In the past we've scapegoated, witch hunted, crucified, and martyred those with Neanderthal traits. Today we are labeling these Upriser Neanderthal traits with psychological disorder diagnoses like ADHD and bipolar and then drugging those traits out of our collective experience. Finally, as these Upriser traits are increasingly discovered to be ancient genetic relics from modern human's brief tryst with the Neanderthals, will a neo-genocide occur through quiet but selective genetic screening? Will expectant mothers soon hear, "Would you like Neanderthal gene contaminations removed from your embryo which would put your child at high risk for developing ADHD, bipolar disorder, Asperger's, autism and addictions?" What mother could resist, unless she knew that those very genes could very well also be the greatest gift to human progress?

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I read a book about how much closer humans and neanderthal were than previously thought, so I guess the author was right. Also I went to a speech yesterday that I completely zoned out during and or didn't understand but conclusion was that Jesus preached to neanderthal. But now that I write that out, I'm realize I'm a few tens of thousands of years off, so I'm going to admit that I probably definitely didn't get a thing out of that lecture.

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I am so conflicted about what to do for my Honours project next year :/

 

My tutor has recommended something to do with Acid Phosphatase reactions and elimination of false positives. Another recommended isolation of a presumptive test reagent for blood, something other than KM and LMG, but I cba with that lol. Someone else is recommending something to do with determination of specific tissue identity using microRNA.

 

So much choice :/

 

That said, there is one that peaked my interest but I don't know if I'll be allowed to do it at uni. Mainly because it requires specialised equipment which I think we have but I'm not sure.

 

Anywho, feel free to throw in some ideas :P

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I am so conflicted about what to do for my Honours project next year :/

 

My tutor has recommended something to do with Acid Phosphatase reactions and elimination of false positives. Another recommended isolation of a presumptive test reagent for blood, something other than KM and LMG, but I cba with that lol. Someone else is recommending something to do with determination of specific tissue identity using microRNA.

 

 

dafuq-did-i-just-read-meme.jpg

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I am so conflicted about what to do for my Honours project next year :/

 

My tutor has recommended something to do with Acid Phosphatase reactions and elimination of false positives. Another recommended isolation of a presumptive test reagent for blood, something other than KM and LMG, but I cba with that lol. Someone else is recommending something to do with determination of specific tissue identity using microRNA.

 

So much choice :/

 

That said, there is one that peaked my interest but I don't know if I'll be allowed to do it at uni. Mainly because it requires specialised equipment which I think we have but I'm not sure.

 

Anywho, feel free to throw in some ideas :P

 

I left the Chemistry phase of my life when I transitioned to Uni... Sad times.

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^ The universe is just some kind of an accident. All this stuff just popped into existence all by itself one day. /sarcasm

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I left the Chemistry phase of my life when I transitioned to Uni... Sad times.

 

I'm thankfully heavily involved in Chemistry and Biology. Never thought I'd say this but Forensic Biology is fascinating!

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Heard this quote in a lecture today and it really stuck with me. So intriguing in it's simplicity. It truly is the creed of forensic science.

 

It really sums up the gist of it all and makes you realise that no matter how good you think you are, you'll never get away with it. And this applies not just here but in the hereafter too. The world, your body, the things you see and touch will all bear witness either for you or against you on one day, in the future.

 

"Wherever he steps, whatever he touches, whatever he leaves, even unconsciously, will serve as silent evidence against him. Not only his fingerprints or his footprints, but his hair, the fibres from his clothes, the glass he breaks, the tool mark he leaves, the paint he scratches, the blood or semen that he deposits or collects - all these and more bear mute witness against him. This is evidence that does not forget. It is not confused by the excitement of the moment. It is not absent because human witnesses are. It is factual evidence. Physical evidence cannot be wrong; it cannot perjure itself; it cannot be wholly absent. Only its interpretation can err. Only human failure to find it, study and understand it, can diminish its value."

 

Dr Paul Kirk (1953)

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