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Salubrious

 

Health-giving; healthy: 'odours of far less salubrious origin'

or

(Of a place) pleasant; not run-down: 'an over-priced flat in a none too salubrious area'

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Defenestrate (english verb): to thrown someone out of a window.

 

I've always wondered by there's an English word for such a specific act, and wikipedia says this is why:

 

 

The term originates from two incidents in history, both occurring in Prague. In 1419, seven town officials were thrown from the Town Hall, precipitating the Hussite War. In 1618, two Imperial governors and their secretary were tossed from Prague Castle, sparking the Thirty Years War. These incidents, particularly in 1618, were referred to as the Defenestrations of Prague and gave rise to the term and the concept.

The word root derives from Latin fenestra for "window".

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Defenestrate (english verb): to thrown someone out of a window.

 

I've always wondered by there's an English word for such a specific act, and wikipedia says this is why:

 

Haha

Al4eP.gif

 

Wonder if they'll coin a phrase for throwing someone out the door because of Uncle Phil and Jazzy Jeff

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Internecine (noun): a war that is harmful to both sides involved.

 

Originally the word meant a war that was fought to the death, but when Samuel Johnson was working on his English dictionary he misinterpreted the 'inter' as meaning 'between' instead of an intensifier of necare, the latin for 'to kill'.

 

In a sentence: Bitter internecine warfare was a fact of life for the tribes of the desert.

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Internecine (noun): a war that is harmful to both sides involved.

 

Originally the word meant a war that was fought to the death, but when Samuel Johnson was working on his English dictionary he misinterpreted the 'inter' as meaning 'between' instead of an intensifier of necare, the latin for 'to kill'.

 

In a sentence: Bitter internecine warfare was a fact of life for the tribes of the desert.

Equally harmful to both? Or more harmful to one, but with greater perceived benefit also?

 

You could get great use out of that word if used symbolically...

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flatter: insincere praise.

 

Which confuses me when I hear this quote: 'Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. '

 

Seems contradictory because how can it sincere and insincere at the same time.

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exculpate:

 

to clear from alleged fault or guilt

 

e.g. The court exculpated him after a thorough investigation

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Procrastinator (n)

 

1) One who delays / avoids work (revision especially) until the night before their morning exam.

2) Those most likely to fail in life.

 

~ Best used to describe FATTII.

 

Source: My mind
Published 16/06/14 @ 02:54am

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Procrastinator (n)

 

1) One who delays / avoids work (revision especially) until the night before their morning exam.

2) Those most likely to fail in life.

 

~ Best used to describe FATTII.

 

Source: My mind

Published 16/06/14 @ 02:54am

Stunter (n)

1) One who delays / avoids work (revision especially) until the night before their morning exam.

2) Still likely to succeed

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flatter: insincere praise.

 

Which confuses me when I hear this quote: 'Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. '

 

Seems contradictory because how can it sincere and insincere at the same time.

 

:hmm: So we should be flattered if someone imitates us?

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