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Catfish Bobby

The art of story telling

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Out of the precisely pi books I've read, 'Arabian Nights' is one that has had a big influence on me. I love the stories, the way their written, where they take place, the magic. When I think about 'storytelling' as a concept, I automatically associate it with Arabian Nights, I think the book epitomises it. From the core concept of the book to the individual stories.

 

The question is though, what is the art of storytelling? What does that mean to you?

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"Well, a picture can express a thousand words
To describe all the beauty of life you give
And if the world was yours to do over
I know you'd paint a better place to live
Where the colors would swirl
And the boys and girls can grow in peace and harmony
And where murals stand on walls so grand
As far as the eyes are able to see"

 

That evokes a story, to me.

 

(P.S, if anyone can tell me where that's from, I'll eat your hat)

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(P.S, if anyone can tell me where that's from, I'll eat your hat)

what a stupid thing to say in age of google

Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five Ft: Master Melle Mel

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I prefer stories that have a good balance between action and description. I find that not many authors are capable of doing that, even the really good ones sometimes end up with a little bit of extra drabby description in some parts. I love it when you read a book and you can vividly create the images from the pages in your mind as if you were in it or watching it on a screen. Those are the ones that really capture my attention.

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what a stupid thing to say in age of google

Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five Ft: Master Melle Mel

 

Ahhh damn it! I meant to put that as a caveat! Please to mail me your hat so I can eat it.

 

I prefer stories that have a good balance between action and description. I find that not many authors are capable of doing that, even the really good ones sometimes end up with a little bit of extra drabby description in some parts. I love it when you read a book and you can vividly create the images from the pages in your mind as if you were in it or watching it on a screen. Those are the ones that really capture my attention.

 

I see what your saying, any examples?

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I need something that makes me think extensively; something I can dissect and analyse and find fun and substance in doing so. With any book, TV show, video game or comic, if the story truly captures me, I do this every time-- treat it like a test subject and absorb everything I can about it. I have very few, but highly focused interests, so if something holds my attention, I'm engrossed. No grey area with me. If I can't get something from it to dig into, I tend to drop it.

 

Good storytelling makes me feel undivided from what I'm reading, takes away any feeling that I'm simply reading off a page, and, if from a work of fiction, makes me forget that the characters and settings aren't real during which. I like things that often leave room for me to examine and guess a little without just handing things to me consistently. This is why stories involving lots of mystery and subtle implications which unravel slowly are my kinda thing.

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I'm actually the opposite. Any reason why, though?

 

the plot is better. for example, in the book, the dragon dies an anti-climactic death following boring episodes by Bilbo. In the movie, Bilbo and the dwarfs put up a good struggle against the dragon, who also focuses on the intruders at hand first before getting a good reason to go to the village.

 

The bilbo meeting golum scene is better in the movie, whereas in the book its like a story for children. Well, it was a story for the children I guess.

 

gandalf leaves the team abruptly for no good reason in the book. Movie gives him a good reason.

The group getting lost in the forest is unnecessarily detailed in the book.

 

There were other examples, but I can't remember them all.

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I need something that makes me think extensively; something I can dissect and analyse and find fun and substance in doing so. With any book, TV show, video game or comic, if the story truly captures me, I do this every time-- treat it like a test subject and absorb everything I can about it. I have very few, but highly focused interests, so if something holds my attention, I'm engrossed. No grey area with me. If I can't get something from it to dig into, I tend to drop it.

 

Good storytelling makes me feel undivided from what I'm reading, takes away any feeling that I'm simply reading off a page, and, if from a work of fiction, makes me forget that the characters and settings aren't real during which. I like things that often leave room for me to examine and guess a little without just handing things to me consistently. This is why stories involving lots of mystery and subtle implications which unravel slowly are my kinda thing.

 

you should definitely try Issac Asimov's Black widowers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Widowers

It's better than Sherlock Holmes in some regards.

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Cheers Haku, I'll look out for the first book next time I visit the bookstore. It seems like something I'd get into.

book store? what happened to internet?

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book store? what happened to internet?

 

It's the one of the things I always get at the store. Going there and browsing is therapeutic for me, and I prefer having a book in my hand right after buying instead of having it delivered. There's also some other things I might want that aren't specifically in-mind right now, so I'll be having a riffle. Last time I went, I ended up getting some good study books along with the stuff I initially went for.

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When I can connect to the narrator/characters this makes for a great story..also that moment when an author says something you've not been able to somehow put in to words

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the plot is better. for example, in the book, the dragon dies an anti-climactic death following boring episodes by Bilbo. In the movie, Bilbo and the dwarfs put up a good struggle against the dragon, who also focuses on the intruders at hand first before getting a good reason to go to the village.

 

The bilbo meeting golum scene is better in the movie, whereas in the book its like a story for children. Well, it was a story for the children I guess.

 

gandalf leaves the team abruptly for no good reason in the book. Movie gives him a good reason.

The group getting lost in the forest is unnecessarily detailed in the book.

 

There were other examples, but I can't remember them all.

I disagree. I think the plot seems to be getting a bit lost in the books with all the side stories that they have going on. Jackson tries to add in aspects to connect the books together, backstories that come from other books or from appendices in the various series. I agree that the death of Smaug in the book left something to be desired but the dragon hasn't died yet in the movie. Bard still has to kill the dragon and its important that he does it. I did like the action scenes with the dwarves and the dragon. Bilbo's first meeting with Smaug went down much better in the book imo.

 

I don't know which Hobbit you read but the scene with Bilbo and Gollum in the book was great. And it came to life very well in the films. There wasn't much difference in the scenes either. But the scene with the riddles was done extremely well in the movies and was even better in the book imo.

 

In the books, Gandalf leaves abruptly all the time (in all the books, not just this one) and turns up unexpectedly as well. This, imo, was done on purpose because it creates a sense of mystery around the wizard as wizards are meant to be enigmatic. I don't see it a flaw per se.

 

 

 

While I liked the movie a lot I have to say, certain things were much better in the book. Beorn, for instance was much better described in the book and I feel a little let down by Jackson in this sense because in all the characters he brought to life they fit what I imagined them to be, except for Beorn :no:

That entire scene with Beorn annoyed me tbh. I didn't like the Thranduil much but those elves are not the nice and pretty ones like those from Rivendell and Lothlorien. And that barrel scene :rolleyes: but the movie needed action and the book lacks that kind of action until the end. I did like the addition of Tauriel although I'm not sure what they're trying to do with her and Kili. Give Legolas a reason to hate dwarves? And how come Arwen couldn't save Frodo from a morgul blade and had to take him to Rivendell for Elrond to heal but Tauriel (although head of the guards, a soldier nonetheless) could save Kili from the same wound? Unless in Frodo's case you have to factor in the fact that he was wearing the ring and that he was in that shadow realm.

 

 

 

Tolkein gets carried away with his description sometimes and thats why I wouldn't his name down for a well balanced book. But there are some areas where he achieves it very well. I'd say the Hobbit for the most part, Book1,2, 5 and 6 of LOTR is another example (except for the end of book 6).

 

Pratchett does it very well, a good blend of action, adventure, humour and description in his books. I can feel myself in the Discworld when I read those books. I can see AnkhMorpork (sometimes even smell it too) through the way he describes it and I can get completely caught up in it.

 

I'd say the same with GoT, for the most part, although he does have his moments as well where he spends a page or two describing every detail of a leaf falling from a tree. In the shorter books its better.

 

Paul Zindel books as well. He always writes about misfits but his writing is creative, fresh and funny and real at the same time.

 

I love books that I can lose myself in become part of. Its hard for me to name authors and titles and things cos I don't usually pay attention to those things :/

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