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This thread is for anyone who is interested in learning this challenging and artistic writing system with Enigma.

 

In Japanese, there are three types of alphabet: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Hiragana is for native Japanese words and grammatical elements, and Katakana is mainly for words of foreign origin. They are both syllabaries-- Na, Ne, Ni, No, Nu ... Ka, Ke, Ki, Ko, Ku. Etc.

 

Kanji, however, is different.

 

From my grammar book;

 

In the beginning of the 4th or 5th century, the Japanese adopted written symbols and many vocabulary items from the Chinese. These symbols or Chinese characters are called Kanji. They represent both meaning and sound, and often one kanji has more than one pronunciation (or reading, as it's commonly called) and meaning. Japanese people learn about 2,000 Kanji by the end of junior high school. Those are the basic characters used in newspapers, magazines and school textbooks. The Japanese know several thousand additional Kanji as well. Kanji range from simple, with one or two strokes, to complex, with many strokes needed to make one character. Some look like pictures, or line drawings, of the words they represent.

 

Every day, I teach myself new characters for kicks. For this thread, I will draw two kanji a day here with the correct stroke order.

Note: The strokes will be numbered, with a red dot indicating the starting point of the pen stoke. I may also share some grammar notes for the examples.

 

All right, Maniacs, let's learn something fun!

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Now, the first two;

 

 

1. WATASHI (wah-tah-shee) = I, Myself ~~ 7 Strokes

WATASHIafcfd.jpg

WATASHIorder1.png

Example:

です

Watashi wa Nazo desu. = I am Enigma.

2. INU (ee-noo) = Dog ~~ 4 Strokes

INU.jpg

INUorder1.png

Example:

美しいです

Inu wa utsukushii desu. = (The) dog is beautiful.

 

Notes for understanding the examples: "Wa" is a particle that marks the subject of the sentence, which it usually follows. "Desu" (pronounced "Des") loosely translates to "is", "am", "are", (words for 'being') and it has an explanatory or confirmatory function. When present, it's a polite word that often comes at the end of a sentence.

 

 

That concludes the first set. Feel free to discuss however you like, add contributions with your drawings, etc. Please do. It would be nice to see, and different for MM. c:

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Oooooo I'm up for learning this! How would i spell my name in Japanese? I'll post a pic of my attempt :D

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Oooooo I'm up for learning this! How would i spell my name in Japanese? I'll post a pic of my attempt :D

 

Great. c: 'Hazera' is a non-Japanese name, and therefore a foreign word, so we'll be using katakana to spell your name. Like hiragana (but unlike Kanji), each basic character should always be treated as a syllable.

This is how it's written:

 

 

HAZERA22.png

 

Pen stroke order:

 

HAZERA11.png

 

ハゼラ

Ha Ze Ra

 

In one of the examples, I posted a kanji for my username, but that wouldn't be how I'd formally use it because the reading of the character for enigma is "Nazo" and not how we read it. Instead, for it to be "Enigma", I would also spell it out in Katakana;

エニグマ
(E-Ni-Gu-Ma) - The closest pronunciation.
I'm by no means an expert. Still green as hell when it comes to Japanese. I have Hiragana and Katakana memorized, though, so I wouldn't mind doing more names if anyone wants. I'll be here again later today.
Note: In the case of the keyboard characters I'm posting (the ones you can highlight e.g. グ, ハ), all words containing Kanji will be colour-coded. Hiragana and Katakana that are not part of the same word will be left black.
-
-

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How did you learn this Enigma? I love this stuff! :thumbup:

 

Mainly through books, sometimes the internet (only sources from those who are native Japanese speakers), some apps here and there while I'm commuting, and watching and reading series in Japanese. Lots and lots of reading. Someday, I'll take classes. If you ever want some resources, feel free to ask. c:

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3. TSUKI (tsoo-kee) = Moon ~~ 4 Strokes

TSUKI.jpg

TSUKIorder1.png

Example:

はどこですか

Tsuki wa doko desu ka? = Where is the moon?

4. NATSU (nat-soo) = Summer ~~ 10 Strokes

NATSU.jpg

NATSUorder1.png

Example:

ジョンさんの休みはいつ始まりますか。

Jon-san no natsuyasumi wa itsu hajimarimasu ka? = John, when does your summer vacation start?

 

Second set.

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Oh Enigma, where art thou? We are missing Kanjis for three days now, so you will have to post six now to catch up ! :)

 

I might ask for resources some time, but right now I just want to follow this class :thumbs: :like:

 

 

*Waiting patiently to learn some more words*

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Wow! I find it amay-zing there is actually a whole different alphabet for words of foreign-language origin. There is so much in that. Much thanks Enigs :thumbup:

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tumblr_m4wsjxeoBI1qe7736o1_500.gif

 

Whoahhh. I'm sorry to anyone following for not updating this for eons. I'm officially done from stuff now, so I'll be continuing the sets tomorrow. c:

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I've learned a bit of japanese just from watching anime

 

I'd say it's decent for words here and there, but I realised that it's pretty problematic trying to learn from anime. The first thing is, grammar is often compromised in anime scripts. There's also a great lack of etiquette in animespeak that isn't appropriate when interacting with Japanese people, and oftentimes you'll absorb things that aren't actually heard outside of anime. In Japanese, there is a serious emphasis on tone, with multitudes of different words that attach to sentences and define a certain level of politeness and respect. Watching anime is good for developing your ear for the language and for vocabulary, but I wouldn't trust it as an accurate display of the language as a whole. Just a thought.

 

Also, it would be nice to hear some of your thoughts about anime stuff you're watching/have seen. There's an anime thread in the Entertainment section. Do post in there sometime. New animeheads are always welcome. c:

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