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Spider

A Nightly Exhilaration

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spiderman finally found his match in superman

 

(for most useless rambles)

 

lol dude maybe you're getting dejavu (look at the multiverse thread).

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So, in the verse where Allah said that the night is the most suitable time for the Quran, do you think that that is more accurate for people in Arabia than other places of the world?

You were claiming sleep deprivation = heightened emotional state thus better for reading Quran.

 

Obviously not the case in the Prophet (PBUH) time nor according to his lifestyle, seeing as he wouldn't have been sleep deprived.

For your claim to be true it must've also applied to the Prophet (PBUH) and it doesn't because the Prophet (PBUH) had siestas.

 

You can claim quietness and less distractions at night, but definitely not sleep deprivation.

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You were claiming sleep deprivation = heightened emotional state thus better for reading Quran.

 

Obviously not the case in the Prophet (PBUH) time nor according to his lifestyle, seeing as he wouldn't have been sleep deprived.

For your claim to be true it must've also applied to the Prophet (PBUH) and it doesn't because the Prophet (PBUH) had siestas.

 

You can claim quietness and less distractions at night, but definitely not sleep deprivation.

 

I think that the Qaylula (siestas/naps) were more like a kind of 'recovery sleep.' In one verse Allah says that "They used to sleep but little of the night." Therefore, naturally enough, they must be getting more and more drowsy as they continue to stay awake. Sleep propensity will undoubtedly increase to some degree at least. So at some point they might just have to sleep. Otherwise the cumulative effects of sleep loss at night will be too much to handle.
Maybe "sleep-deprived" sounds a bit negative and unbefitting and thus it cannot be ascribed to the Prophet (SAW). But this impression is mainly a result of us being conditioned by popular science and conventional wisdom. From a religious perspective, there is also a noble and beneficial side to it. This resonates with a comment I've heard from a Shaykh (which I posted earlier, in post # 3) who said:
"You wanna train yourself to sleep as little as possible as well. Imagine this, that even some scholars today, even as well as the past, they would sleep as much as 3 to 5 hours every single day - especially when they were memorizing Quran." - Shaykh Musleh Khan
I don't know what his sources are for saying this, but I don't think he is making this up. Maybe the scholars believed that sleeping little is good for reading the Quran. Maybe the scholars wanted to follow the practice of the Prophet himself when Allah commanded him in Surah Muzammil to "Stand all night, except a little" and recite the Quran.

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I think that the Qaylula (siestas/naps) were more like a kind of 'recovery sleep.' In one verse Allah says that "They used to sleep but little of the night." Therefore, naturally enough, they must be getting more and more drowsy as they continue to stay awake. Sleep propensity will undoubtedly increase to some degree at least. So at some point they might just have to sleep. Otherwise the cumulative effects of sleep loss at night will be too much to handle.

Maybe "sleep-deprived" sounds a bit negative and unbefitting and thus it cannot be ascribed to the Prophet (SAW). But this impression is mainly a result of us being conditioned by popular science and conventional wisdom. From a religious perspective, there is also a noble and beneficial side to it. This resonates with a comment I've heard from a Shaykh (which I posted earlier, in post # 3) who said:

 

"You wanna train yourself to sleep as little as possible as well. Imagine this, that even some scholars today, even as well as the past, they would sleep as much as 3 to 5 hours every single day - especially when they were memorizing Quran." - Shaykh Musleh Khan
I don't know what his sources are for saying this, but I don't think he is making this up. Maybe the scholars believed that sleeping little is good for reading the Quran. Maybe the scholars wanted to follow the practice of the Prophet himself when Allah commanded him in Surah Muzammil to "Stand all night, except a little" and recite the Quran.

 

No Qaylula is cemented as something the Prophet (PBUH) did daily.

 

Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said, Take the noon nap, for the Shaytan does not nap. [Tabarani (Awsat)] This was mentioned in al-Ghiyathiyya. [5.372]

في الفتاوى الهندية: (5/372) ويستحب التنعم بنوم القيلولة لقوله عليه السلام { قيلوا فإن الشياطين لا تقيل } كذا في الغياثية .

It specifically allowed them to sleep little at night.

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Well, we still haven't found out exactly how long the naps were. That's the information you need in order to establish how much he slept - in total.


But given the verses and quotes that I have provided thus far, it seems that there is a stronger justification to think that the Prophet used to sleep little, overall. And when I say "little," I'm not trying to convey that this is an extreme level of sleep-deprivation, but rather that it is of a tolerable, less-than-extreme nature, for the Prophet at least.

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Well, we still haven't found out exactly how long the naps were. That's the information you need in order to establish how much he slept - in total.
But given the verses and quotes that I have provided thus far, it seems that there is a stronger justification to think that the Prophet used to sleep little, overall. And when I say "little," I'm not trying to convey that this is an extreme level of sleep-deprivation, but rather that it is of a tolerable, less-than-extreme nature, for the Prophet at least.

 

 

You don't know how long he slept at night though either. With the evidence you presented you can't conclusively claim the Prophet (PBUH) deprived himself of sleep for the sake of heightened emotions.

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Spider, why do you get so evasive and obnoxious when people ask you basic questions re:the ahem-interesting claims you are prone to making?

 

Or better than that, is what you do to Moose, where you start scouring threads to quote him back at himself from other contexts and tell him what he means lol.

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You don't know how long he slept at night though either. With the evidence you presented you can't conclusively claim the Prophet (PBUH) deprived himself of sleep for the sake of heightened emotions.

He used to sleep little at night, maybe from around 4 to 7 hours each night. His naps would obviously be even shorter compared to his regular sleep.
"The night stances (qiyam al-layl), the hours he spent in worship, reflection and prayers all occupy an important place in the Prophet’s life. He is reported to have spent on average between 2/3 to 3/4 of each night in worship, remembrance, reflection, and supplication. This corresponds to a period of 4 to 7 hours each night, depending on the season." (Source)
Also, I didn't say anywhere that the Prophet deprived himself of sleep for the sake of heightened emotions. I only wanted to demonstrate that this effect (i.e. heightened emotional sensitivity due to sleep-deprivation) may be one of the benefits of reciting the Quran at nighttime with little sleep.

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Spider, why do you get so evasive and obnoxious when people ask you basic questions re:the ahem-interesting claims you are prone to making?

 

I don't think I was being evasive nor obnoxious. I was simply replying back with direct and intelligent questions. As one example, superman made the claim that I don't understand my sources, but when I told him to back that up, he didn't respond to that. He also asked me what brainwaves are, and said that he wanted to know what the scientific implications are. However, typing such an in-depth and technical explanation of brainwaves would just make my post unnecessarily tedious and it would derail us from discussing the main points in my thread. That is simply why I felt that the question is not worth answering - to that level of specification. He said that he already does understand brainwaves at a colloquial level though (just like in the case of energy, as he said), and then I told him that that's good enough. But if you take that as being "evasive," then I don't know what else to say.

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He used to sleep little at night, maybe from around 4 to 7 hours each night. His naps would obviously be even shorter compared to his regular sleep.

 

"The night stances (qiyam al-layl), the hours he spent in worship, reflection and prayers all occupy an important place in the Prophet’s life. He is reported to have spent on average between 2/3 to 3/4 of each night in worship, remembrance, reflection, and supplication. This corresponds to a period of 4 to 7 hours each night, depending on the season." (Source)

 

Also, I didn't say anywhere that the Prophet deprived himself of sleep for the sake of heightened emotions. I only wanted to demonstrate that this effect (i.e. heightened emotional sensitivity due to sleep-deprivation) may be one of the benefits of reciting the Quran at nighttime with little sleep.

The article you link isn't a strong source it's an opinion piece. Furthermore, it could mean 2/3 or 3/4 of the time he didn't spend sleeping was spent in worship. You cannot objectively say that the Prophet (PBUH) slept less than the average person or engaged in worship when he was half asleep.

 

Also an actual Hadith in your source instead of conjecture:

“The best nightly prayer in God’s sight is that of David. He used to sleep during the early part of the night, then wake up and spend a third of the night in prayers and sleep a little again before dawn” [bukhari, Tahajjud, 7; Muslim, Siyam, 189; Nasai, Qiyam al-layl, 14, available in Harf 2000].

 

The fact the Prophet (PBUH) stated that this way of performing qiyam was the best means he wouldn't deviate from it much.

 

Night (isha until sunrise) in that part of Arabia is typically 8PM-5:30AM. That's 9:30 hours to 12 hours in length as it varies a little bit throughout the year. A third of that is approx 3-4hrs, but also leaves plenty of time for sleep (an average of 7 and a halfish hours through the year). Combine it with a daily 30 min nap (not too long not too short) and you're up to an 8 hour average sleep throughout the year.

 

In the Levant (where Prophet Dawud (AS) is suspected to have been), the night has more variation but the average 2/3 of a night for sleep would equate to approx 7:30hrs throughout the year too.

 

All that can really be said is the Prophet (PBUH) followed a different sleeping schedule to most where he'd go to sleep earlier so that he could wake up to engage in night prayers. He also supplemented his sleep with naps. You can't say he reduced the overall amount of sleep he had because there is no strong evidence to support that assertion.

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