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I need to get a set of pots, nothing too big though cos its just me. Someone told me to get two AMC pots, but I ain't paying 2k for a pot. I had a set but they were pretty rubbish so I returned them. I am currently cooking out of the frying pan and the thing I use to fry chips. I've only made curry once since I've been on my own and the gravy was an issue, I think also because of the vessel that I used. What is the best material to buy for cooking? I'm very confused between the stainless steel, cast aluminium and cast iron that I see in stores.

 

I don't have a lot of space in my freezer, but back home we do the same thing. My mum buys the ginger and garlic and then slices and dices and chops and mixes and puts them in the ice cube trays and freezes, same with chilli mixture. I wish I could do that too but I have a small freezer and I'm not going to buy a bigger one cos that will use more electricity and I'm cheap.

Online most people say a good quality heavy pot (with lid) is an investment - for making anything with a sauce really and also for slow cooking. With your work hours and lifestyle though, I can't see you having time to use a slow cooker unless it's the electric ones with timers that are ready for when you come home.

 

I'm thinking of purchasing an Instapot which is a sealed electric unit that can slow cook, pressure cook, normal cook, rice cook, porridge, stews, make bone broth and stews. I rarely have the time to actually stand and attend to pots and pans, but a lot of recipes require this. I don't want to pin all my hopes on an Instapot and not use it enough to justify the cost though.

 

Has anybody got a Kitchen Aid?

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Yes those do sound like good essentials to have. I have been searching around for what people consider the best pot for curries and most say a Dutch oven, casserole dish or any heavy-bottom pan. But then again, I've seen families with really cheap and thin cookware cook amazing things in it- so perhaps it's a "a good workman doesn't blame his tools" kind of thing.

 

Good cookware are easy to work with, but are not essentials. We got cheap(est) cookware from Walmart and my wife still can cook to impress.

 

 

Online most people say a good quality heavy pot (with lid) is an investment - for making anything with a sauce really and also for slow cooking. With your work hours and lifestyle though, I can't see you having time to use a slow cooker unless it's the electric ones with timers that are ready for when you come home.

 

I'm thinking of purchasing an Instapot which is a sealed electric unit that can slow cook, pressure cook, normal cook, rice cook, porridge, stews, make bone broth and stews. I rarely have the time to actually stand and attend to pots and pans, but a lot of recipes require this. I don't want to pin all my hopes on an Instapot and not use it enough to justify the cost though.

 

Has anybody got a Kitchen Aid?

We have an instapot, it's quite worth it. The book that comes with it is a good start. you can set the timer and forget.

We even made baked chicken in it and it came very nice. There are lots of online resources for pressure cooking things which are traditionally not cooked that way.

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Which one? There are so many!

 

I have found an AMAZING halal Japanese restaurant. They do sushi of all types, edamame, katsu curry, ramen, kare lomen- EVERYTHING.

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Good cookware are easy to work with, but are not essentials. We got cheap(est) cookware from Walmart and my wife still can cook to impress.

 

Get her on here to pass on hints and tips. And yes, I agree- skillz r skillz and not dependent on the pots and pans :(

 

 

We have an instapot, it's quite worth it. The book that comes with it is a good start. you can set the timer and forget.

We even made baked chicken in it and it came very nice. There are lots of online resources for pressure cooking things which are traditionally not cooked that way.

 

How often in an average week do you use it? I imagine it being useful for stew and saucy-type things (and slow cooking)- but we also grill and oven-bake quite a bit, so I'm wondering if it will be an expensive but redundant purchase. I am so tempted though because I've burnt so many potentially great dishes because I've been too busy/distracted to stand at the stove and watch over them. The last and most sad case was a Malaysian laksa curry I was making where I got the base to PERFECTION. Then I had to run off to break up WW3 and came back to it incinerated like tar. It was almost as sad as GOTF :(

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Which one? There are so many!

 

I have found an AMAZING halal Japanese restaurant. They do sushi of all types, edamame, katsu curry, ramen, kare lomen- EVERYTHING.

 

Katsu curry with chicken is amazing!! There's one in town I go to because they are not afraid to make it spicy!

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Lol, yknow what I really want to learn - Vietnamese soup dishes!

 

I tell you what is one of my worries though, how do people have a varied diet within a budget?

 

For example if you stick to desi diet, its roti/rice and salan. The base ingredients for salan are all the same and then you just buy the meats and veg on top. It seems simple. But I think when you make fancy roats, fish dishes, just new dishes for which you have to go out and buy extra ingredients doesn't it get very expensive?

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Zimpoopweewee-head, do you follow a a schedule of what you're gonna cook on each day and then shop accordingly?

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cilantro goes well with that one dish pasta. just be mindful of the strength (it's stronger than basil)

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Lol, yknow what I really want to learn - Vietnamese soup dishes!

 

I tell you what is one of my worries though, how do people have a varied diet within a budget?

 

For example if you stick to desi diet, its roti/rice and salan. The base ingredients for salan are all the same and then you just buy the meats and veg on top. It seems simple. But I think when you make fancy roats, fish dishes, just new dishes for which you have to go out and buy extra ingredients doesn't it get very expensive?

stuff like tinned beans and fresh veg are fairly cheap. There's quite a lot of grains you can get fairly cheap, like rice or cous cous (and plenty others). In terms of meat, chicken breast is fairly cheap and whilst fish is expensive the recommended amount is only twice a week. Potatoes are super cheap and you don't just have to make it into salan.

 

I personally despise salan for what it can do to fresh vegetable - for instance it turns courgettes bitter and soggy - eat this oily mixture with roti and you literally have something that has no flavour and the most horrible texture.

 

Look towards the Mediterranean diet if you want something healthy/tasty. For a while people thought it was the red wine they drank that made them healthy, but realised it was their food instead. Italian cooking is very simple but they make veg better than pakis that's for sure

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Desis butcher vegetables like no other cuisine "style" I know. If it's a "salad", it's literally shredded onions and a a bit of cucumber if you're lucky. If it's actually meant to be a vegetable starter/main, then it's either fried or cooked to death until it's mush and then coated in a jug full of ghee to completely seal it's demise. In a vegetable curry, you will not be able to tell the difference between the 4 different potential vegetables it contains- neither in appearance, texture or taste.

 

I've found the Japanese and general Oriental method of either raw, al dente or 'flash frying' vegetables to be the best for preserving the nutrients, taste and also features of what the actual vegetables actually are.

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Zimpoopweewee-head, do you follow a a schedule of what you're gonna cook on each day and then shop accordingly?

 

Yes, when I'm being good and organised- this is one of the best ways to reduce my stress and increase my efficiency in the week. So on a weekend, if I can list out 5-6 different evening meal ideas, then I'll check if we have the necessary ingredients and if not, make a shopping list for the supermarket, butchers or fish mongers (as appropriate). Then if I know at the beginning of the day what I'm making, on my GOOD days, I'll cook lunch and dinner at the same time. And for extra points (and if it's possible with the type of food)- I'll cook dinner for tomorrow aswell and put it in the fridge. It saves a lot of money, wasted ingredients, wasted time and also lets you schedule in advance so you deliberately plan your veggie days, your fish days, your lighter meal days and your "treat"-ish days. So you don't end up cooking the same things 2-3 days in a row because you're out of inspiration. Meal planning is great if you can develop the discipline to do it regularly........and it doesn't require more than 10-15 minutes thought and listing when you sit down for it.

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Desis butcher vegetables like no other cuisine "style" I know. If it's a "salad", it's literally shredded onions and a a bit of cucumber if you're lucky. If it's actually meant to be a vegetable starter/main, then it's either fried or cooked to death until it's mush and then coated in a jug full of ghee to completely seal it's demise. In a vegetable curry, you will not be able to tell the difference between the 4 different potential vegetables it contains- neither in appearance, texture or taste.

 

I've found the Japanese and general Oriental method of either raw, al dente or 'flash frying' vegetables to be the best for preserving the nutrients, taste and also features of what the actual vegetables actually are.

Apparently, by desi you mean northern indian. Let me introduce you to south-Indian/Sri Lankan vegetarian dishes. The veggies (*snicker at shaver*) are not raw or al dante, but the flavour of each vegetable is preserved and elevated.

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Do you mean unripe mango pickling? Give me examples!

 

I went to a Sri Lankan restaurant last year full of excitement and I came away depressed- it was awful! I think I had idly and sambal but they were just very badly done (I hope).

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